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    What is Mosaic Art?

    Learn what mosaic art is. Connect the definition of mosaic art with how mosaic art designs are created. See mosaic history with examples of mosaic...

    Humanities Courses / Course / Chapter

    What is Mosaic Art?

    Hugh Zimmerbaum, Christopher Muscato

    Learn what mosaic art is. Connect the definition of mosaic art with how mosaic art designs are created. See mosaic history with examples of mosaic works. Updated: 11/28/2021

    Table of Contents

    What Is a Mosaic? Mosaic History Types of Mosaic Art

    Creating Mosaic Art Designs

    Lesson Summary Show Create an account

    What Is a Mosaic?

    What is a mosaic? Mosaic art is the decoration of a surface with small, variously colored pieces of material. The pieces, which can be made of stone, glass, tile, or a variety of other materials, are called tesserae. They are applied to the surface with an adhesive. Mosaic art is similar to painting, in that both are two-dimensional forms of art used for surface decoration. An artist making a mosaic has a more limited color palette than a painter, but materials such as glass can capture and reflect light for a unique effect.

    Quiz Course 12K views

    A 2nd Century CE mosaic depiction of a Gorgone.

    Mosaic History

    Mosaic history stretches from the 3rd millennium BCE to the present day. Mosaic has held an important place in western art since antiquity, and it was the leading form of pictorial art in Byzantium. Mosaic art also arose in some non-western cultures, such as in Pre-Columbian Central America.

    Early Mosaic Art

    The earliest known examples of mosaic art are Mesopotamian mosaics made of clay cones, which decorated mud-brick temples dating from between 3500 and 3000 BCE. These mosaics showed geometric patterns rather than figurative designs. However, this technique fell out of usage and seems not to have had an effect on the later development of mosaic art.

    Cones used for ancient mosaic temple decoration.

    Greek and Roman Mosaic Art

    Houses with decorative pebble floors dating from around 800 BCE have been discovered in Asia Minor. This technique seems to have spread to Ancient Greece, where mosaic art was refined by Greek craftsmen and underwent new developments. By the 5th century BCE, Greek mosaics made of dark and light stones showed intricate patterns and artful depictions. In the 4th century BCE, the pebbles were being painted red and green, and smaller pebbles were being used to achieve more intricate and realistic scenes. At the beginning of the 3rd century BCE, cut, glass mosaics gradually began replacing pebble mosaics. This greatly widened the color palette and introduced smoother textures and new lighting effects, increasing mosaics' potential to achieve illusory artistic effects.

    A 4th century BCE Greek mosaic depicting Dionysos riding a cheetah.

    The Romans adopted mosaic art from the Greeks and used it widely in domestic decoration and in their places of worship. Mosaics could often be found in private villas. With urban expansion, the demand for producing mosaics quickly and easily led Roman floor mosaics to become more simplified, less artful over time. However, in the 3rd century CE, the status of mosaic began to change. Mosaic started to be used in the vaults of buildings and on the walls, rather than on the floor. There were precedents for this in the Greek world, and in certain periods and places in the Roman world, such as at Pompeii. Another important development of this time was that mosaic began to replace statues as the medium used for depicting religious imagery.

    A 2nd century AD Roman mosaic showing a scene representing the month of March.

    Christian and Byzantine Mosaics

    As Christianity began to spread from the 4th century, Roman and Greek mosaic techniques were used to adorn Christian places of worship and depicted Christian religious scenes. The fall of Rome and the ascendance of the Byzantine Empire brought the art of mosaic to a new height. Throughout the history of the Byzantine Empire (roughly spanning the 5th to the 15th centuries), mosaic art would be the most prevalent form of pictorial art, and mosaics were a key element of Byzantine architecture.

    Byzantine mosaic underwent a number of technical developments over the centuries. Tesserae were tilted to reflect greater light, and stone and glass tesserae were used together to create beautiful contrasts. Furthermore, gold backgrounds became prevalent. Byzantine artists refined techniques for using gold tesserae in the halos of holy figures, giving them a brilliant aura. As time went on, silver cubes were added to the gold to increase the sparkle of reflected light. Stylistically, lines of tesserae became wavier and allowed for boundaries to be created by lines rather than colors. Iconic, motionless depictions of religious figures, such as the Holy Virgin and various saints, were notable. Late Byzantine mosaics from the 13th century onwards showed an interest in realistic depictions and humanism, which would lead to the Italian Renaissance to the West. The rise of fresco painting in the Renaissance coincides with the decline of mosaics.

    स्रोत : study.com

    Mosaic

    We usually invite the world to create the sum of all human knowledge. Now, we are inviting the world to create the sound of all human knowledge.

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    Mosaic

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to navigation Jump to search

    This article is about a decorative art. For other uses, see Mosaic (disambiguation).

    Various examples of mosaics. Each row of 3 pictures represents a style: Ancient Greek or Roman, Byzantine and Art Nouveau

    A mosaic is a pattern or image made of small regular or irregular pieces of colored stone, glass or ceramic, held in place by plaster/mortar, and covering a surface.[1] Mosaics are often used as floor and wall decoration, and were particularly popular in the Ancient Roman world.

    Mosaic today includes not just murals and pavements, but also artwork, hobby crafts, and industrial and construction forms.

    Mosaics have a long history, starting in Mesopotamia in the 3rd millennium BC. Pebble mosaics were made in Tiryns in Mycenean Greece; mosaics with patterns and pictures became widespread in classical times, both in Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics. Mosaic art flourished in the Byzantine Empire from the 6th to the 15th centuries; that tradition was adopted by the Norman Kingdom of Sicily in the 12th century, by the eastern-influenced Republic of Venice, and among the Rus. Mosaic fell out of fashion in the Renaissance, though artists like Raphael continued to practice the old technique. Roman and Byzantine influence led Jewish artists to decorate 5th and 6th century synagogues in the Middle East with floor mosaics.

    Figurative mosaic, but mostly without human figures, was widely used on religious buildings and palaces in early Islamic art, including Islam's first great religious building, the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, and the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus. Such mosaics went out of fashion in the Islamic world after the 8th century, except for geometrical patterns in techniques such as zellij, which remain popular in many areas.

    Modern mosaics are made by artists and craftspeople around the world. Many materials other than traditional stone, ceramic tesserae, enameled and stained glass may be employed, including shells, beads, charms, chains, gears, coins, and pieces of costume jewelry.

    Contents

    1 Mosaic materials 2 History 2.1 Greek and Roman

    2.2 Christian mosaics

    2.2.1 Early Christian art

    2.2.2 Ravenna 2.2.3 Butrint

    2.2.4 Late Antique and Early Medieval Rome

    2.2.5 Byzantine mosaics

    2.2.6 Rome in the High Middle Ages

    2.2.7 Sicily 2.2.8 Venice

    2.2.9 Medieval Italy

    2.2.10 Western and Central Europe

    2.2.11 Renaissance and Baroque

    2.2.12 The Christian East

    2.2.13 Orthodox countries

    2.3 Jewish mosaics

    2.4 Middle Eastern and Western Asian art

    2.4.1 Pre-Islamic Arabia

    2.4.2 Pre-Islamic Persia

    2.4.3 Islamic art 2.4.3.1 Arab 3 Modern mosaics

    3.1 As a popular craft

    3.2 In street art

    स्रोत : en.wikipedia.org

    Mosaic Art Test Module 1

    Find and create gamified quizzes, lessons, presentations, and flashcards for students, employees, and everyone else. Get started for free!

    7th

    7th Mosaic Art Test Module 1

    Christine Byun 13 plays

    20 Qs

    Show Answers See Preview 1. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    A mosaic is made up of hundreds or thousands of individual small tiles called

    answer choices Grout line Opus Tesserae Andamento 2. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    This material is used for walls and ceilings, while colored limestones and marbles are durable enough to use for floor mosaics.

    answer choices Granite Limestone Marble Glass 3. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts

    Q.

    San Vitale is one of the most important surviving examples of what type of architecture and mosaic work?

    answer choices Roman Byzantine Islamic Contemporary 4. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    What is used to protect your eyes when working with glass?

    answer choices Safety Glasses Sun Glasses Kabuki Mask Welding Helmet 5. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    The following image is an example of

    answer choices Roman Byzantine Islamic Contemporary 6. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    The following image is an example of

    answer choices Roman Byzantine Islamic Contemporary 7. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    The following image is an example of

    answer choices Roman Byzantine Islamic Contemporary 8. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    What is the name of the Andamento practiced in your first mosaic work?

    answer choices Opus Opus Regulatum Opus Palladianum Opus Andamento 9. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Andamento can be described as the ____________.

    answer choices Emphasis in work Names of colors

    Visual flow using rows of tesserae

    Names of different styles describing the andamento

    10. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Opus can be described as the ____________.

    answer choices Emphasis in work Names of colors

    Visual flow using rows of tesserae

    Names of different styles describing the andamento

    11. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Tessellatum in the background?

    answer choices 12. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Vermiculatum?

    answer choices 13. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Regulatum?

    answer choices 14. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Musivum?

    answer choices 15. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Palladianum?

    answer choices 16. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Circumactum?

    answer choices 17. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Tessellatum?

    answer choices 18. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Classicum?

    answer choices 19. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which work shows Opus Sectile?

    answer choices 20. Multiple-choice 20 seconds 5 pts Q.

    Which is the following is NOT Opus Sectile?

    answer choices

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