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    10 Modern Day Space Observatories in India

    India has a long tradition of creating space observatories. In the early 19th century, Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five Jantar Mantars in total, in New Delhi, Jaipur, Ujjain, Mathura and Varanasi; they were completed between 1724 and 1735. Earlier observatories were primarily intended to measure the time of day, correct to half […]

    Published on February 13, 2017

    In Opinions

    10 Modern Day Space Observatories in India

    By Analytics India Magazine

    India has a long tradition of creating space observatories. In the early 19th century, Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five Jantar Mantars in total, in New Delhi, Jaipur, Ujjain, Mathura and Varanasi; they were completed between 1724 and 1735.

    Earlier observatories were primarily intended to measure the time of day, correct to half a second and declination of the Sun and the other heavenly bodies. Later, they evolved with the purpose to provide support on shipping and Geomagnetism. Just like planetariums, space observatories indicate the inclination of a country toward astronomy and outer space exploration.

    Here we list down 10 such modern day space observatories that showcases India’s quest for space (in alphabet order).

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    1: 3.6 m Devasthal Optical Telescope, Nainital

    The 3.6m Devesthal Optical Telescope is a clear aperture Ritchey-Chretien style telescope built by Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences(ARIES) and is located at the Devasthal Observatory site near Nainital, India. ARIES operates another 1.3m telescope at the same location. The telescope was activated remotely on March 31, 2016 by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel from Brussels. The telescope optics has been built in collaboration with the Belgian firm Advanced Mechanical & Optical System (AMOS).

    2: Gauribidanur Radio Observatory, Gauribidanur

    The Gauribidanur Radio Observatory is a radio telescope observatory located at Gauribidanur, near Bengaluru. It is operated jointly by Raman Research Institute and the Indian Institute of Astrophysics. The observatory has been in operation since 1976.

    3: Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, Pune

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), located near Pune in India, is an array of thirty fully steerable parabolic radio telescopes of 45 metre diameter, observing at metre wavelengths. It is operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, a part of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. At the time it was built, it was the world’s largest interferometric array offering a baseline of up to 25 kilometres (16 mi).

    4. Girawali Observatory, Pune

    IUCAA Girawali Observatory is an optical astronomy observatory run by the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Pune. The Observatory is located about 80 km from Pune City, off the Pune Nashik Highway.

    5: Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle

    The Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO), located near Leh in Ladakh, India, has one of the world’s highest sites for optical, infrared and gamma-ray telescopes. It is operated by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. It is currently the second highest optical telescope in the world, situated at an elevation of 4,500 meters (14,764 ft).

    6: Kodaikanal Solar Observatory, Kodaikanal

    The Kodaikanal Solar Observatory is a solar observatory owned and operated by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics. It is on the southern tip of the Palni Hills 4 km from Kodaikanal town, Dindigul district, Tamil Nadu state, South India.

    The Evershed effect was first detected at this observatory in January 1909. Solar data collected by the lab is the oldest continuous series of its kind in India. Precise observations of the equatorial electrojet are made here due to the unique geography of Kodaikanal.

    7: Madras Observatory, Chennai

    The Madras Observatory was founded by the British East India Company in 1786 in Chennai (then Madras). For over a century it was the only astronomical observatory in India that exclusively worked on the stars. Among the astronomers at the observatory were Norman Robert Pogson, Michael Topping and John Goldingham. By 1899, it had been relegated to gathering weather-related data.

    8: Ooty Radio Telescope, Ooty

    The Ooty Radio Telescope is located in Muthorai near Ootacamund (Ooty), south India. It is part of the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA) of the well known Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) which is funded by the Government of India through the Department of atomic energy. The Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) is a 530-metre (1,740 ft) long and 30-metre (98 ft) wide Cylindrical Paraboloid telescope. It operates at a frequency of 326.5 MHz with a maximum bandwidth of 15 MHz at the front-end.

    स्रोत : analyticsindiamag.com

    For the ultimate ‘Star Wars’, visit India’s popular astronomical observatories

    Observatories in India: Here is a list of astronomical observatories spread across India, which you can visit if you like the idea of exploring celestial bodies. More on Times of India Travel.

    For the ultimate ‘Star Wars’, visit India’s popular astronomical observatories

    Panchali Dey/Times Travel Editor/

    TRAVEL TRENDS, INDIA

    / Updated : Sep 18, 2018, 12:15 IST

    Synopsis

    The universe is under no obligation to make sense to us, humans. And this very fact has been making men curious from time immemorial. In fact, Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five Jantar Mantars in total, which were bu …

    Read More

    Credit: ThinkStock Photos

    The universe is under no obligation to make sense to us, humans. And this very fact has been making men curious from time immemorial. In fact, Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five Jantar Mantars in total, which were built in Jaipur, New Delhi, Varanasi, Mathura and Ujjain. These structures were completed between 1724 and 1735.

    Mankind has always been fascinated to discover the unknown, and in this quest, a lot of breakthroughs and discoveries have been made. The inquisitiveness motivated men to use and develop technology, which aided him in exploring the celestial bodies. Now, there are numerous modern observatories all around the world, which are a unique combination of high-end technology and conventional astronomy knowledge.

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    It is the unending spirit to unlock the secrets of universe that we have been able to come so far. And in this aspect, India does not lack behind. In fact, significant effort and time have been spent to set up such high-end observatories and build an entire generation of astronomers. These observatories are built in such a manner that they also give access to common man to experience the brilliance of a starry and bright night sky.

    If you are inclined or want to know more about the planetary bodies, visit these astronomical observatories in India.

    Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle

    Photo by:  Indiajoe, Creative Commons Attribution Licence

    The Indian Astronomical Observatory sits at a height of 15,000 ft at Hanle in Ladakh, and is the second highest observatory in the world. This observatory has, therefore, been a matter of pride for Indian scientists. There is very little artificial light and because this region boasts of clear and cloudless nights almost throughout the year, these conditions make this spot an ideal location for astronomical observation.

    Astronomers from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) Bengaluru operate this observatory, and houses the 2 m class Chandra telescope. In fact, the Hanle village in Ladakh also hosts a High Altitude gamma ray observatory apart from the Chandra Observatory.

    Kodaikanal Solar Observatory, Kodaikanal

    Photo by:  Marcus334, Creative Commons Attribution Licence

    The solar observatory established in 1899 in picturesque Kodaikanal is perhaps the oldest observatory in the world. Run by Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Tamil Nadu, this observatory has in store more than 100 years of data on the Sun and its influence on Earth and surrounding space. It is interesting to note that the same family for generations has been taking care of preserving those daily records.Udaipur Solar Observatory, Udaipur

    This Udaipur Observatory proudly sits on an island in the Fateh Sagar Lake. As the observatory is located amid a large mass of water, the air turbulence that happens because of ground heating by the rays of sun is decreased. Thus, the quality of image and their accuracy is far better than its other contemporaries. The Udaipur Solar Observatory has been built and designed on the lines of the solar observatory at the Big Bear Lake in Southern California.

    Credit: ThinkStock Photos

    Also, being one of the six Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG), this observatory is world’s second (the first being in China) to possess the unique multi-application solar telescope (MAST) for detailed study of eruptions and solar flares.

    Vainu Bappu Observatory, Kavalur

    This is another observatory in India that is being operated and owned by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA). It houses the Vainu Bappu Telescope, which boasted of being the Asia’s largest telescope until another telescope of 3.6 m was set up in 2016 in Nainital’s ARIES observatory.

    Located at Kavalur, near Vaniyambadi, it was named in the honour of M.K. Vainu Bappu (former director of Kodaikanal Observatory and a famous astronomer).

    Photo by:  Prateek Karandikar, Creative Commons Attribution Licence

    स्रोत : timesofindia.indiatimes.com

    Collect information = ahowt —various observatorics in India and present it in the class.

    Collect information = ahowt —various observatorics in India and present it in the class.

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    Observing Space: Telescopes

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    Updated On: 27-06-2022

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