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    greatest number of sweat glands are present in which part of the human body

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    Greatest Number Of Sweat Glands Are Present In Which Part Of The Human Body? A. Forehead B. Forearm C. Palm Of The Hand D. Back Doubt Answers

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    Naina Kashyap

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    Greatest number of Sweat glands are present in which part of the human body? A. Forehead B. Forearm C. Palm of the hand D. Back

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    Muskan Anand

    4 months ago

    Option c) Sweat glands are tubular glands that are present in the skin. This is responsible for the secretion of sweat. ∙ As these glands contain ducts, they can be included under exocrine glands. ∙ There are two types of glands which are the eccrine gland and the apocrine gland. ∙ The two regions with the highest number of sweat glands are the palm of the hand and the sole of the feet. ∙ The density of sweat glands in these two regions ranges between 600 - 700 sweat glands/sq. cm.

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    Sweat Gland

    Sweat Gland

    Sweat gland (eccrine, apocrine, apoeccrine) carcinomas are exceedingly rare, arise most frequently in the skin of the head and neck or the extremities, and manifest as painless papules or nodules that grow slowly.

    From: Clinical Radiation Oncology (Fourth Edition), 2016

    Related terms:

    NeoplasmLesionProteinSebaceous GlandSweatingDermisEpidermisHair Follicle

    View all Topics

    Skin and Skin Appendage Regeneration

    Krzysztof Kobielak, ... Yvonne Leung, in Translational Regenerative Medicine, 2015

    IV Sweat Gland

    Structure and Function

    Sweat glands are coiled tubular structures vital for regulating human body temperature. Humans have three different types of sweat glands: eccrine, apocrine, and apoeccrine. Eccrine sweat glands are abundantly distributed all over the skin and mainly secrete water and electrolytes through the surface of the skin. Apocrine glands secrete oily substances containing lipids, proteins, and steroids through hair canals and are found only in skin containing hair (restricted to the armpits, mammary, anal, and genital areas) [189,190]. Rather than responding to temperature, apocrine glands often respond to emotional stimuli including anxiety and fear. Under these circumstances, sweating is often observed in the armpits, palms, and soles of the feet [191–193]. For decades it was believed that these are the only two types of sweat glands. In 1987, however, apoeccrine glands were identified in areas of apocrine glands but secreted watery fluids similar to eccrine glands [194]. Unlike humans, animals such as dogs and mice have sweat glands only in their paws because they have evolved a different method of thermoregulation, namely panting. In these animals, sweat glands are present in the paws to provide friction for running and climbing. For the purposes of this chapter, we focus only on eccrine sweat glands, referring to them hereafter as “sweat glands.”

    In humans, roughly 1.6 to 5 million sweat glands are found in the skin, and the amount varies between individuals as well as anatomic sites [195]. The region with greatest sweat gland density is the palms and soles of the feet, which contain 600–700 sweat glands/cm2 [195]. The primary function of sweat glands is to keep the core body temperature at approximately 37 °C by releasing sweat in a hot environment or during physical activity [189,195]. Sweat glands are innervated by neurons, so the process of sweating is controlled by the central nervous system. Thermosensitive neurons in the brain can detect the internal body temperature and external skin temperature, instructing sweat glands to respond accordingly to maintain a constant core body temperature [189,195]. When an increase in temperature is detected, sweat is induced to cool the skin, and internal body temperature decreases when the sweat evaporates from the surface of the skin. Therefore, sweat glands are essential in keeping the body temperature constant. A core body temperature higher than 40 °C can result in protein denaturation and apoptosis [189]. Physically, it can lead to hyperthermia, commonly known as heat exhaustion or heat stroke, which can be fatal.

    Sweat is a dilute electrolyte solution composed of 99% water, sodium chloride, potassium, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, lactate, ammonia, and urea [196]. During sweating, some of the ions are reabsorbed through Na+/K+ ATPases on the membrane of the sweat duct [189,195]. In addition to Na+/K+ pumps, chloride channels also are found in sweat glands.

    Sweat glands consist of a coiled acinar secretory structure in the dermis and a straight duct that connects this acinar structure to the surface of the epidermis (Figure 4). This acinar secretory coil contains a basal layer composed of two distinct cell types, clear cells and myoepithelial cells, as well as a luminal layer composed of dark cells [5] (Figure 4). These dark cells secrete glycoproteins that can be identified with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. In the basal layer, clear cells are rich in mitochondria and contain basolateral infoldings where water and ions are secreted. This sweat subsequently travels through small intercellular canals to reach the lumen and through the sweat duct to be secreted at the skin surface [5]. Myoepithelial cells are located at the periphery of sweat glands and are believed to provide support for the sweat gland structure (Figure 4).

    Sweat Gland Disorders

    Sweat gland disorders range from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) and decreased sweating (hypohidrosis) to no sweating (anhidrosis). While hyperhidrosis is generally not a serious condition, anhidrosis can lead to death from hyperthermia. Patients with hypohidrosis or anhidrosis often display symptoms of heat intolerance that may lead to fatigue, weakness, dizziness, and difficulty breathing. Hyperhidrosis most commonly affects the armpits, palms, and soles of the feet [197]. Depending on its severity, hyperhidrosis can be treated with topical aluminum salts or anticholinergic oral medications [198].

    Hypohidrosis and anhidrosis are commonly caused by obstruction of sweat pores and ducts, as seen in patients with psoriasis, dermatitis, sclerosis, and miliaria. Some patients with miliaria, also known as a sweat rash, feel a stinging sensation in the affected areas caused by sweat retention from the ductal occlusion [198]. In some cases, controlling the temperature and humidity of the environment to reduce sweating can relieve the obstruction. Hypohidrosis and anhidrosis may also be caused by dysfunctional sweat glands, as in Fabry’s disease of systemic sclerosis or absent sweat glands in anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia [198,199]. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a dermatological disorder that affects multiple skin appendages, including sweat glands [200]. It is caused by a mutation in the ED1 gene-encoding ectodysplasin-A (EDA) ligand, its EDA receptor, or EDARDD adaptor protein, and can be life threatening for children because of their inability to sweat [201–203]. Hypohidrosis may also result from injuries caused by burns, irradiation, and trauma that damage sweat glands. In general, all these conditions vary in severity and can either be localized to a specific region of the body or more globally affect a patient.

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    Where do you find the largest number of sweat glands in man ?

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    Where do you find the largest number of sweat glands in man ?

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    Updated on : 2022-09-05

    Solution Verified by Toppr Solution:

    ∙ Sweat glands are tubular glands that are present in the skin. This is responsible for the secretion of sweat.

    ∙ As these glands contain ducts, they can be included under exocrine glands.

    ∙ There are two types of glands which are the eccrine gland and the apocrine gland.

    ∙ The two regions with the highest number of sweat glands are the palm of the hand and the sole of the feet.

    ∙ The density of sweat glands in these two regions ranges between 600 - 700 sweat glands/sq. cm.

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