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    Safety performance measurements for industry

    How and why industry safety performance is measured and the ways in which that safety information is used.

    Safety performance measurements for industry

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    Safety performance measurements for industry

    On 31 March 2022, the Work Health and Safety (WHS) laws replaced the health and safety elements of the Mines Safety and Inspection laws. For information visit www.dmirs.wa.gov.au/whs

    All health and safety notifications, forms and guidance for mining and petroleum has moved to the WorkSafe website

    The information below has been left for historical compliance reference purposes

    How is safety performance measured?

    Why measure safety performance?

    Identifying trends in safety performance

    Annual safety performance reports

    Mining incident summaries

    Mining fatality summaries

    Significant incident reports and safety bulletins

    How is safety performance measured?

    Safety performance can be measured in a number of ways, usually through a combination of lag (output) and lead (input) indicators.

    Lag indicators ? measure outcomes after an incident (e.g. incident rate, lost time work injury), and is effectively a measure of past resultsLead indicators ? measure activities to prevent or reduce the severity of an incident in the present or future (e.g. safety training, safety audits).

    Why measure safety performance?

    Measuring performance allows the review of an industry or organisation’s safety and health performance over time. This may identify trends or clusters of incidents that can be tackled to prevent workplace deaths, injury and disease.

    Safety performance information also provides feedback on the effectiveness of controls and systems of work, allowing continual improvements to be made.

    Measuring performance allows questions to be answered such as:

    Are we achieving our overall health and safety aims and objectives?

    Are we getting better or worse over time in controlling hazards and risks?

    Are we managing safety and health effectively (doing it right)?

    Do we have an effective health and safety management system in place across all parts of the organisation?

    How do we compare with others? Can we learn from them?

    Identifying trends in safety performance

    Industry is required to lodge a variety of information with the department regarding incidents and workforce numbers.

    The industry data and results of selected investigations are subsequently released as:

    annual safety performance reports

    quarterly performance snapshots

    monthly safety and health snapshots

    summaries for industry awareness

    mining fatality summaries

    significant incident reports and safety bulletins

    additional reports and surveys.

    The department produces these resources to help industry identify trends in safety performance and start making the necessary changes. When combined with site or operational statistics, these tools can assist mining operations in improving their safety performance and moving towards a resilient safety culture.

    What accidents and incidents need to be reported for a mining operation?

    What is involved in reporting an accident or incident for a mining operation?

    Annual safety performance reports

    Safety performance reports are published annually and cover the accident and injury statistics for the financial year.

    They include information on:

    fatal accidents serious injuries lost time injuries

    workers’ compensation premiums

    injuries by commodities

    disabling injuries

    for mining activities, and some statistics for exploration activities.

    You can search for the safety performance reports and posters in the Safety statistics area and download them as a PDF.

    Mining incident summaries

    Mining incidents reported to Resources Safety since January 2010 have been edited and made available to the public as summaries for industry awareness. This resource is updated regularly and can be interrogated, viewed and the results exported to a Microsoft Excel file for analysis via the Safety Regulation System (SRS).

    Search Summaries for industry awareness by the date, incident type and the operational area through the Safety Regulation System (SRS).

    Mining fatality summaries

    Information on workplace fatalities in Western Australian mines recorded since 1943 is available through a search facility in the Safety Regulation System (SRS).

    Search mining fatality summaries by date or operational area through the Safety Regulation System (SRS).

    Significant incident reports and safety bulletins

    To share the learnings from investigations, the department issues a variety of safety alerts.

    Significant incident reports - information about single incidents, accidents or fatalities

    Safety bulletins - information about trends or clusters in reported accidents and incidents from a State, national or international perspective.

    You can search for significant incident reports and safety bulletins in the Safety alerts area and download them as a PDF.

    Report on fatal accidents in the Western Australian mining industry 2000-2012

    A study undertaken by the department in 2013 and published in 2014 reviewed mining fatality reports for Western Australia from 2000 to 2012 inclusive. The aim was to identify some key activities and areas where improvements can be made. In the 13 years covered by the review, there were 52 mining-related deaths, with an average of four deaths per annum. Over this period, the industry workforce increased by 60,000.

    स्रोत : www.dmp.wa.gov.au

    (PDF) Comparing the Performance of Two Industries during the Crisis

    PDF | Industries create specific business settings that exert a backward influence on industry prospects. In this paper we examine and compare how two... | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate

    ArticlePDF Available

    Comparing the Performance of Two Industries during the Crisis

    December 2016Ekonomski Horizonti 18(3):261-275

    DOI:10.5937/ekonhor1603261K

    LicenseCC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    Project: Adjustment of Croatian Business Entities to Market Competition in the EU

    Authors:

    Marija Kastelan Mrak

    University of Rijeka

    Danijela Sokolic

    University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics and Business

    Nenad Vretenar

    University of Rijeka

    Abstract and Figures

    Industries create specific business settings that exert a backward influence on industry prospects. In this paper we examine and compare how two industries, the construction industry and the food and beverage processing industry, have behaved during a crisis period. First we compare performance indicators available from statistic sources, and then proceed to compare panel data of two subsamples of the largest Croatian firms in terms of capital and employment related to the construction and food processing in the period 2005-2014. We provide data that demonstrate that the 5 largest business firms in the two industries have a tendency to employ different business behaviors specific to the industry they are part of. The basic idea behind this research was that industry characteristics are created by individual business firms that adjust their behavior, i.e. strategies, organizational design and operation models to perceived industry settings. So, in the longer time period, depending on resource availability at firm level, and market opportunities at the industry, a dominant pattern of business model will evolve. The research showed differences in the rate of activity and in business demography during the observed period. There is also evidence of different business models being employed in construction and food processing. However, at this stage of our research, we were not able to establish a relationship between business model employed and firm or industry performance.

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    स्रोत : www.researchgate.net

    A comparative analysis of safety management and safety performance in twelve construction projects

    Safety management in construction is complicated due to the complex “nature” of the construction industry. The aim of this research was to identify sa…

    Journal of Safety Research

    Volume 71, December 2019, Pages 139-152

    A comparative analysis of safety management and safety performance in twelve construction projects

    Author links open overlay panel

    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsr.2019.09.015

    Get rights and content

    Abstract

    Introduction

    Safety management in construction is complicated due to the complex “nature” of the construction industry. The aim of this research was to identify safety management factors (e.g., risk management and site management), contextual factors (e.g., organisational complexity) and combinations of such factors connected to safety performance. Method: Twelve construction projects were selected to compare their safety management and safety performance. An analytical framework was developed based on previous research, regulations, and standards where each management factor was defined. We employed qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to produce case knowledge, compare the cases, and identify connections between the factors and safety performance. The material collected and analyzed included, for example, construction planning documents, reports from OHS-inspections, safety indicators, and interviews with project leaders and OHS experts. Results and conclusions: The research showed that: (a) the average score on 12 safety management factors was higher among projects with high safety performance compared to projects with low safety performance; (b) high safety performance can be achieved with both high and low construction complexity and organizational complexity, but these factors complicate coordination of actors and operations; (c) it is possible to achieve high safety performance despite relatively poor performance on many safety management factors; (d) eight safety management factors were found to be “necessary” for high safety performance, namely roles and responsibilities, project management, OHS management and integration, safety climate, learning, site management, staff management, and operative risk management. Site management, operative risk management, and staff management were the three factors most strongly connected to safety performance. Practical implications: Construction stakeholders should understand that the ability to achieve high safety performance in construction projects is connected to key safety management factors, contextual factors, and combinations of such factors.

    Introduction

    The construction industry in Europe (EU-28) had the highest share of fatal occupational accidents in 2015, with more than one in five accidents (Eurostat, 2018). Safety management in construction is demanding, since construction projects are technologically and organizationally complex (Lingard, 2013).

    Previous research on the effectiveness of occupational health and safety management (OHSM) on safety performance is ambiguous, and the importance of different factors are debated (Zwetsloot, 2013). There is little research on the effect of safety management systems and programs on safety performance in construction. There is, however, some research that has identified factors potentially connected to safety performance in construction, for example management commitment (Loushine, Hoonakker, Carayon, & Smith, 2006), subcontractor selection and management (Hallowell & Gambatese, 2009), worker involvement (Chen & Jin, 2012), interrelations between various project partners (Terwel & Jansen, 2014), site-specific safety plans (Hallowell & Calhoun, 2011), and safety culture (Choudhry, Fang, & Mohamed, 2007).

    The aim of this research is to identify how safety management factors, contextual factors, and combinations of such factors influence safety performance. To do that, we (a) developed an analytical framework iteratively based on relevant literature and empirical results; (b) analyzed documents (e.g., health and safety plans, inspection reports), safety indicators, and interviewed project leaders and OHS inspectors from 12 construction projects; and (c) assessed factors and combinations of factors connected to safety performance employing Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) (Ragin, 1987, Ragin, 2008, 2008). The study was performed in cooperation with Statsbygg, a Norwegian government client organization who build and rehabilitate public buildings.

    Construction contractors have traditionally been held responsible for OHS on construction sites (Lingard & Rowlinson, 2005). In 1992, the EU Construction Sites Directive (92/57/EEC) (European European Commission, 1992, European Commission, 2011) put heavy responsibility for OHS on the client. The motivation for the directive was the recognition that many occupational accidents had been attributed to unsatisfactory architectural and/or organizational options, poor planning, and inadequate co-ordination (Berger, 2000). Clients can play a positive role in safety management during construction projects (Huang and Hinze, 2006, Lingard et al., 2018, Spangenberg, 2010). This paper focuses on safety management in construction projects primarily from a client’s perspective.

    Section snippets

    Section snippets Literature on safety management

    Safety management can be defined as “the process to realize certain safety functions,” and a safety management system (SMS) is commonly defined as “… the management procedures, elements and activities that aim to improve the safety performance of and within an organization” (Li & Guldenmund, 2018, p. 96). An occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) is defined as “A set of interrelated or interacting elements to establish OSH policy and objectives, and to achieve those

    स्रोत : www.sciencedirect.com

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