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    in the last decade, hcl has reduced its per capita scope 1 & 2 ghg emissions by _____%.

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    Climate Literacy Quiz

    How's your climate literacy? The explanations beneath each question describe each concept in plain language, with links to references and teaching materials. Test your knowledge, and learn as you go. ...

    Climate Literacy Quiz

    Climate Literacy Quiz How's your climate literacy? The explanations beneath each question describe each concept in plain language, with links to references and teaching materials. Test your knowledge, and learn as you go.

    Spanish-language version of quiz

    is also available »

    Thank you to Dr. Aleya Kaushik for providing the scientific review for the quiz.

    Most recent update to the data in this quiz: July 2021.

    Wherever possible, links to current data are provided. Note that some of the data changes fairly rapidly.

    Learn more about Teaching Climate »

    Try the Energy Literacy Quiz »

    स्रोत : cleanet.org

    HCL: Annual GHG Emissions (2020 – 2021, Tonnes CO2 Equivalent)

    In 2021, the technology company HCL’s total GHG emissions decreased by 42% on an annual basis. HCL’s Scope 3 emissions accounted for 6.3% of its total GHG emissions in 2021.

    HCL: Annual GHG Emissions (2020 – 2021, Tonnes CO2 Equivalent)

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    Industry: IT Services

    Current: ESG

    In 2021, HCL’s total GHG emissions decreased by 42% on an annual basis

    HCL’s Scope 3 emissions accounted for 6.3% of its total GHG emissions in 2021

    HCL made an operational investment of INR 2.5 million which helped to reduce its carbon footprint

    Global warming places life on earth in danger, posing a threat to fresh water, food, and energy supplies. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are the primary cause of global warming. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) are GHGs produced by the combustion of oil, fossil fuels, and other sources.

    Approximately 2% to 3% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions is generated by the technology and communication industry. GHG emissions are produced by industry operations such as energy consumption, product manufacture, and product use. According to the International Telecommunication Union, digital technology has the potential to reduce world carbon emissions by roughly 17%. Technology companies can help other industries improve their operational efficiency by cutting GHG emissions.

    HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL) is a provider of a range of software services and IT infrastructure services. The company offers a wide range of solutions in enterprise application services, IT infrastructure management, custom application services, next generation SaaS application services, and engineering and R&D services. In 2021, the technology company reported total GHG emissions of around 0.16 million tonnes CO2 equivalents (MtCO2eq), down 42% from 2020.

    Scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are the three categories of GHG emissions. Scope 1 emissions for HCL include emissions from combustion of diesel fuel in generator sets and boilers used to power the campuses and fugitive emissions. Indirect GHG emissions from the generation of purchased energy, such as the electricity needed to power the company's facilities, are referred to as Scope 2. Scope 3 emissions refer to the company's other indirect emissions beyond the company’s direct operations and occur in the company’s value chain, such as emissions from business travel.

    Scope 2 emissions account for most of HCL’s overall GHG emissions, accounting for 80.9% of total GHG emissions (0.13 MtCO2eq) in 2021. In 2021, the company's Scope 1 emissions fell by 8%, and Scope 3 emissions fell by 87%.

    During FY 2020-2021, HCL made an operational investment of INR 2.5 million which helped to reduce its carbon footprint by estimated 300 tCO2eq. The company has also invested INR 3.2 million on water conservation initiatives.

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    Analysis: Which countries are historically responsible for climate change?

    Carbon Brief looks at national responsibility for historical emissions of CO2 from 1850-2021, updating analysis published in 2019.

    Halifax in West Yorkshire, England, in the early 1900s. Credit: KGPA Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo.

    EMISSIONS

    Analysis: Which countries are historically responsible for climate change?

    SIMON EVANS

    10.05.21 EMISSIONS

    Analysis: Which countries are historically responsible for climate change?

    Historical responsibility for climate change is at the heart of debates over climate justice.

    History matters because the cumulative amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted since the start of the industrial revolution is closely tied to the 1.2C of warming that has already occurred.

    In total, humans have pumped around 2,500bn tonnes of CO2 (GtCO2) into the atmosphere since 1850, leaving less than 500GtCO2 of remaining carbon budget to stay below 1.5C of warming.

    This means that, by the end of 2021, the world will collectively have burned through 86% of the carbon budget for a 50-50 probability of staying below 1.5C, or 89% of the budget for a two-thirds likelihood.

    In this article, Carbon Brief looks at national responsibility for historical CO2 emissions from 1850-2021, updating analysis published in 2019.

    For the first time, the analysis includes CO2 emissions from land use and forestry, in addition to those from fossil fuels, which significantly alters the top 10.

    In first place on the rankings, the US has released more than 509GtCO2 since 1850 and is responsible for the largest share of historical emissions, Carbon Brief analysis shows, with some 20% of the global total.

    Video shows, by ranked nation, cumulative CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, land use and forestry, 1850-2021 (million tonnes). Bottom right, remaining carbon budget to limit global warming at 1.5C (50-50 chance). Animation by Tom Prater for Carbon Brief.

    China is a relatively distant second, with 11%, followed by Russia (7%), Brazil (5%) and Indonesia (4%). The latter pair are among the top 10 largest historical emitters, due to CO2 from their land.

    Climate Justice

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    Meanwhile, large post-colonial European nations, such as Germany and the UK, account for 4% and 3% of the global total, respectively, not including overseas emissions under colonial rule.

    These national totals are based on territorial CO2 emissions, reflecting where the emissions take place. In addition, the analysis looks at the impact of consumption-based emissions accounting in order to reflect trade in carbon-intensive goods and services. Such accounts are only available for recent decades, even though trade will have influenced national totals throughout modern history.

    The analysis then explores the figures in relation to population, where the likes of China and India fall down the rankings. Notably, per-capita rankings depend strongly on the methodology used and – unlike cumulative emissions, overall – these figures do not relate directly to warming.

    Finally, this article presents a detailed explanation of the data behind the analysis, where it comes from and how it was put together, including assumptions, uncertainty and changing borders.

    Why cumulative CO2 matters

    National responsibility for historical emissions

    Cumulative consumption emissions

    Cumulative per-capita emissions

    Methodology: Fossil data

    Methodology: Industrial baseline

    Methodology: Changing borders

    Methodology: Land-use emissions

    Why cumulative CO2 matters

    There is a direct, linear relationship between the total amount of CO2 released by human activity and the level of warming at the Earth’s surface. Moreover, the timing of a tonne of CO2 being emitted has only a limited impact on the amount of warming it will ultimately cause.

    This means CO2 emissions from hundreds years ago continue to contribute to the heating of the planet – and current warming is determined by the cumulative total of CO2 emissions over time.

    This is the scientific basis for the carbon budget, the total amount of CO2 that can be emitted to stay below any given limit on global temperatures.

    The link between cumulative emissions and warming is measured by the “transient climate response to cumulative emissions” (TCRE), estimated by the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report to be 1.65C per 1,000bn tonnes of carbon (0.45C per 1,000GtCO2).

    Carbon Brief’s analysis for this article shows that humans have emitted some 2,504GtCO2 into the atmosphere since 1850, a figure that aligns with those presented by the IPCC and by the Global Carbon Project, an international effort to quantify carbon emissions and sinks each year.

    Based on the TCRE, those cumulative CO2 emissions correspond to warming of around 1.13C – and temperatures in 2020 reached around 1.2C above pre-industrial levels.

    (This article does not consider emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases or aerosols, which are predominantly short-lived and so do not accumulate over time in the same way as CO2. The warming impact of non-CO2 gases is roughly balanced by the cooling from aerosols.)

    स्रोत : www.carbonbrief.org

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