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    16 Days of Activism against Gender

    The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is an annual international campaign that kicks off on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and runs until 10 December, Human Rights Day.

    16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence

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    Bicycle rally in Maldives to celebrate the 16 Days of Activism to end violence against women and girls. Photo: UN RCO Maldives/Lara L. Hill

    The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is an annual international campaign that kicks off on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and runs until 10 December, Human Rights Day.

    The campaign was started by activists at the inauguration of the Women’s Global Leadership Institute in 1991. It continues to be coordinated each year by the Center for Women’s Global Leadership. It is used as an organizing strategy by individuals and organizations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

    In support of this civil society initiative, the United Nations Secretary-General launched in 2008 the campaign UNiTE by 2030 to End Violence against Women, which runs parallel to the 16 Days of Activism.

    Every year, the UNiTE Campaign focuses on a specific theme. This year’s theme is “UNITE! Activism to end violence against women and girls” and invites everyone to play their role in ending violence against women and girls, show support and solidarity to women’s rights activists and to resist the rollback on women’s rights. You can access the concept note here.

    Say No - UNITING SINCE 2009

    To support the system-wide UN campaign and build public engagement, UN Women launched Say NO–UNiTE to End Violence against Women as a social mobilization platform in 2009.

    During its first phase, more than 5 million people signed a global petition to make ending violence against women a top worldwide priority. Between 2009 and 2013 the campaign also led to over 5 million actions in partnership with over 900 civil society organizations globally.

    Actions showcased advocacy efforts by civil society, activists, governments, and the UN system. These ranged from online petitions and social media campaigns to grassroots national awareness-raising initiatives. It included outreach in schools, engaging young people and faith-based organizations and garnering concrete national commitments from governments, and more.

    COMMIT initiative

    In 2012, ahead of the 57th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women which focused on ending violence against women.  UN Women launched the COMMIT initiative, asking governments to take a stand by making new and concrete national commitments to end violence against women and girls.

    By the end of 2013 the European Union as well as 63 nations had joined the initiative, announcing specific measures to address and prevent violence against women and girls. These ranged from passing or improving laws, ratifying international conventions, launching public awareness campaigns, providing safe houses or free hotline services and free legal aid to survivors, supporting education programmes that address gender stereotypes and violence. It has also led to increases in the number of women in law enforcement, peacekeeping forces and frontline services.

    Ending gender-based violence in the context of COVID-19

    To address the escalation of violence against women and girls in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 the United Nations Secretary-General urged all governments to make the prevention and redress of violence against women and girls a key part of their national pandemic response plans. The appeal was answered in a statement by 146 Member States and Observers, expressing strong support.

    As a follow up the Secretary-General’s Executive Committee adopted a “Political engagement strategy” for the UN system in order to mobilize commitments and action to end gender-based violence in the context of COVID-19.

    All governments are called to make commitments and undertake policy actions around four key action areas: Fund, Prevent, Respond and Collect.

    Today Say NO–UNiTE has transitioned into a network for social mobilization that continues to showcase advocacy, news, and actions on ending violence against women and girls by people from all walks of life.

    A global network to end violence against women and girls

    To keep the network informed about key developments and advocacy opportunities, UN Women develops bimonthly action circulars shared with partner organizations and women’s rights activists across the world.

    To join the global UNiTE network you can sign up to receive updates, here. Be part of a global network of people committed to realizing a future that is free from violence against women and girls!

    Here is a list of the most recent circulars:

    2022 July/August. Theme: Addressing trafficking as a form of violence against women and girlsMay/June 2022. Theme: Ending violence against women and girls in the context of conflictsFebruary/March 2022. Theme: Ending violence against women and girls in the context of climate change and the annex to this action circular summarizing the agreed conclusions on CSW66.October/November 2021. Theme: 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based ViolenceAugust/September 2021. Theme: CollectJune/July 2021. Theme: Respond

    स्रोत : www.unwomen.org

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

    The International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women aims to create awareness of the fact that violence against women is a human rights violation that impedes progress in many areas, including poverty eradication, combating HIV/AIDS, and peace and security, and therefore must be confronted and eliminated.

    UNiTE! Activism to End Violence against Women & Girls!

    Five years ago, the #MeToo movement, founded by activist Tarana Burke in 2006, exploded and sparked global mobilization creating a moment of urgency in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls.

    Since then, unprecedented awareness and momentum have been created thanks to the relentless work of grassroots activists, women’s human rights defenders and survivor advocates worldwide to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls.

    At the same time, there has been a rise in anti-rights movements, including anti-feminist groups, resulting in shrinking space for civil society, a backlash against women’s rights organizations and a rise in attacks against women human rights defenders and activists.

    Supporting and investing in strong, autonomous women’s rights organizations and feminist movements is key to ending violence against women and girls.

    That is why this 2022 theme is UNITE! Activism to End Violence against Women & Girls.

    Join our 16 days of activism

    The International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women will mark the launch of the UNiTE campaign (Nov 25- Dec 10) — an initiative of 16 days of activism concluding on the day that commemorates the International Human Rights Day (10 December).

    This campaign, led by the UN Secretary-General and UN Women since 2008, aims to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls around the world, calling for global action to increase awareness, promote advocacy and create opportunities for discussion on challenges and solutions.

    This years’ campaign UNITE! Activism to End Violence against Women & Girls will aim to mobilize all society to become activists for the prevention of violence against women, to stand in solidarity with women’s rights activists and to support feminist movements around the world to resist the rollback on women’s rights and calling for a world free from VAWG.

    Among its activities, there is a UN official event that will take place on Wednesday, November 23 (10.00-11.30am ET.) You can follow the event on line through the UN Women Youtube channel or UN Web TV.

    Join the campaign!

    These 16 Days, get involved! From amplifying the voices of survivors and activists to supporting women’s organizations, we can all act to empower survivors and reduce and prevent violence against women and girls. Share our materials through your social media accounts and become an activist!.

    OFFICIAL CAMPAIGN WEBSITE

    Why we must eliminate violence against women

    Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is one of the most widespread, persistent and devastating human rights violations in our world today remains largely unreported due to the impunity, silence, stigma and shame surrounding it.

    In general terms, it manifests itself in physical, sexual and psychological forms, encompassing:

    intimate partner violence (battering, psychological abuse, marital rape, femicide);

    sexual violence and harassment (rape, forced sexual acts, unwanted sexual advances, child sexual abuse, forced marriage, street harassment, stalking, cyber- harassment);

    human trafficking (slavery, sexual exploitation);

    female genital mutilation; and

    child marriage.

    To further clarify, the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women issued by the UN General Assembly in 1993, defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life.”

    The adverse psychological, sexual and reproductive health consequences of VAWG affect women at all stages of their life. For example, early-set educational disadvantages not only represent the primary obstacle to universal schooling and the right to education for girls; down the line they are also to blame for restricting access to higher education and even translate into limited opportunities for women in the labour market.

    While gender-based violence can happen to anyone, anywhere, some women and girls are particularly vulnerable - for instance, young girls and older women, women who identify as lesbian, bisexual, transgender or intersex, migrants and refugees, indigenous women and ethnic minorities, or women and girls living with HIV and disabilities, and those living through humanitarian crises.

    Violence against women continues to be an obstacle to achieving equality, development, peace as well as to the fulfillment of women and girls’ human rights. All in all, the promise of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - to leave no one behind - cannot be fulfilled without putting an end to violence against women and girls.

    Virtual knowledge centre

    Virtual knowledge centre to end violence against women.

    You are not alone

    Have you experienced abuse and need help? If you have felt threatened, unsafe or need assistance, please see the list of country help lines.

    स्रोत : www.un.org

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

    Ending violence against women is possible, but only if we act together, now. WHO plays a key role in bringing attention to and responding to violence against women as a public health, gender equality and human rights issue.

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

    25 November 2022 العربية 中文 Français Español

    Ending violence against women is possible, but only if we act together, now.

    The International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on 25 November, followed by the global 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-based Violence, is a moment to reflect on, renew, amplify, and strategize to achieve commitments to eliminate violence against women by 2030.

    Ending violence against women is possible, but only if we act together, now. WHO plays a key role in bringing attention to and responding to violence against women as a public health, gender equality and human rights issue.

    Public health information and advocacy

    In every country and culture, more action is needed to ensure women in all their diversity live a life free of violence and coercion. Global estimates are worrying:

    about 1 in 3 (30%) women globally experience physical and/ or sexual violence, mostly at the hands of an intimate partner.

    Such violence starts alarmingly early, almost  1 in 4 (24%) adolescent girls aged 15-19 who have had an intimate relationship has experienced physical or sexual violence from a partner

    Health impacts can last a lifetime - violence affects women’s physical, mental, sexual, and reproductive health. Promising programmes to prevent violence against women and girls exist. The inter-agency RESPECT Women framework summarises evidence for preventing violence against women. Support must be available for women/girls affected by violence, including safe access to care and services.

    How you can get involved…

    Learn more, visit the WHO violence against women health topic page and accompanying  fact sheet, or use the interactive database to learn more about prevalence across countries, regions, and age groups.On social media, share WHO’s infographics and videos to encourage awareness and health seeking. You can tag @WHO & @HRPresearch and use UN Women campaign hashtags: #OrangeTheWorld / #16DaysJoin our upcoming Twitter Space – details coming soon

    Our work

    Strengthening data for action

    Reliable, comparable violence against women data is critical to understanding, advocating for, acting and monitoring progress towards prevention and response. WHO is playing a leading role in strengthening data to inform policies and programmes. WHO Global Database on Prevalence of Violence against Women

    Strengthening the capacity of health systems and providers

    Training health providers and improving system readiness to provide quality care are key aspects of a health systems response to violence against women. The health sector needs to be able to provide safe, effective, survivor-centred care. WHO’s tools support health sectors to achieve this, including: a resource package for strengthening countries’ health systems response, curriculum for training health-care providers, a guide for integrating VAW response content into pre-service training for doctors, nurses and midwives, and an online facilitated training curriculum for contexts where in person training is not feasible.

    Scaling up efforts in humanitarian settings

    WHO also works with partners around the world to promote a health systems response to violence against women and girls in crisis settings.  This includes working to strengthen the health sector response to  rape and intimate partner violence in humanitarian emergencies, where mass displacement and the breakdown of social protections exposes women and children to greater risk.  Access to survivor-centred, high-quality care and services is essential.

    Monitoring accountability

    Health systems have a critical role in responding to women experiencing violence. In May 2016, WHO Member States endorsed a global plan of action on strengthening the health systems response in addressing interpersonal violence.  To monitor progress, WHO has published Addressing violence against women in health and multisectoral policies: A global status report. This resource supports efforts to ensure health sector protocols on violence against women are aligned with WHO recommendations.

    Related

    TOOLSResource package for strengthening countries’ health systems response to violence against womenCaring for women subjected to violence: a WHO curriculum for training health-care providers, revised edition, 2021 (includes handouts, resources for exercises, sessions presentations)

    Fact sheets

    Violence against women 9 March 2021

    More

    WHO's work on violence against women

    स्रोत : www.who.int

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