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    NEP 2020: Why learning in mother tongue is effective but hard to implement

    The idea of using the mother tongue as the medium of instruction in primary school is not new to the Indian education system

    NEP 2020: Why learning in mother tongue is effective but hard to implement

    NEP 2020: Why learning in mother tongue is effective but hard to implement The idea of using the mother tongue as the medium of instruction in primary school is not new to the Indian education system

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    New national education policy | schools in India | mother tongue

    Shreya Khaitan | IndiaSpend  |  Jaipur

    Last Updated at August 12, 2020 11:12 IST

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    The 2011 Census listed 270 mother tongues; of these, as per a 2017 study, 47 languages were used as mediums of instruction in Indian classrooms.

    Early schooling in a child's mother tongue, as recommended in the new National Education Policy, can improve learning, increase student participation and reduce the number of dropouts, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of evidence from around the world. However, this would need new books, fresh teacher training and more funding, experts said. Also, given the multiplicity of languages and dialects in India, it is difficult to home in on the one that can be used as the medium of instruction in an area.

    The National Education Policy (NEP) approved by the Union Cabinet on July 29, 2020, says that wherever possible the medium of instruction in schools until Grade V -- preferably until Grade VIII -- should be the mother tongue or the local or regional language. “All efforts will be made early on to ensure that any gaps that exist between the language spoken by the child and the medium of teaching are bridged,” the NEP says.

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    Read our full coverage on New national education policy

    First Published: Wed, August 12 2020. 11:12 IST

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    NEW NATIONAL EDUCATION POLICY

    SCHOOLS IN INDIA RIGHT TO EDUCATION MOTHER TONGUE INDIAN GOVERNMENT EDUCATION NEWS PREVIOUS STORY NEXT STORY

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    स्रोत : www.business-standard.com

    TimesPro, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta launches Executive Programme in Business Management

    The National Education Policy, 2020 has advocated, that "wherever possible, the medium of instruction until at least Grade 5, but preferably till Grade 8 and beyond, will be the home language/mother tongue/local language/regional language" for both public and private schools

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    TimesPro, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta launches Executive Programme in Business Management

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    TimesPro, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta launches Executive Programme in Business Management

    MediawireLast Updated: Sep 28, 2022, 12:15 PM IST

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    TimesPro and the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta have launched the Executive Programme in Business Management to equip learners with the skills and knowledge required to transition from functional roles to business experts.

    The 12-month IIM Calcutta's flagship business management programme, developed for managers and aspiring leaders, will equip learners to adapt to the fast-paced technological and organisational challenges. It will prepare them with new-age and industry-ready skills to guide their business decisions and help them gain an understanding of the complex socio-economic environment and ethical challenges prevalent.

    The Executive Programme in Business Management is in its 27th batch and among the flagship programmes of IIM Calcutta which includes two campus-immersive sessions for learners, and will be conducted via a state-of-the-art Interactive Learning (IL) platform and delivered in Direct-to-Device (D2D) mode. It follows a proven pedagogy consisting of lectures, case studies, assignments, quizzes, project work etc.

    The programme will help learners vastly enhance their skillsets by learning subjects such as Project Management, Marketing Management, Design Thinking, Innovation, and Entrepreneurial Mindset, Business Analytics and Driving Business in Exigencies and Contingencies, Digital Transformation, and People Management, among others.

    Speaking at the announcement of the programme, Sunil Sood, Chief Business Officer, Executive Education, TimesPro, said, “The changing dynamics across the industry have led to a burgeoning demand for skilled professionals and has become imperative for them to gain an edge to traverse industry-led disruptions. The TimesPro-IIM Calcutta programme in Business Management will equip learners with new-age skills while building strategic and leadership competencies to provide value to the ever-evolving ecosystem.”

    Prof. Nisigandha Bhuyan, Associate Professor, Business Ethics & Communication Group, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, said, “The programme will set a direction for our learners to explore new ideas in today’s ever-changing economy to create change. They will get an in-depth understanding of lifelong skills, enhance their strategic and critical thinking abilities, and take them on a path of self-discovery and leadership. It is our flagship and among the most prestigious programmes offered to professionals from our institution that facilitates mid-career upskilling.”

    About Indian Institute of Management Calcutta:

    Established in November 1961 by the Government of India in collaboration with Alfred P. Sloan School of Management (MIT), the Government of West Bengal, the Ford Foundation, and Indian Industry, the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta (IIM Calcutta) was the first national institute for Post Graduate studies and Research in Management by in November 1961.

    Over the last six decades, IIM Calcutta has gained global repute for imparting high-quality management education through its Post-Graduate and Doctoral level programs, Executive Training Programs, and Research and Consulting Activities. It is the first ‘Triple Accredited’ management school from India with accreditations from Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB); European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS); and Association of MBAs (AMBA).

    Today, IIM Calcutta is one of Asia’s finest Business Schools. Its strong ties to the business community make it the ideal institution to attract India’s best talent and promote management practices in Indian organisations.

    About TimesPro:

    TimesPro, established in 2013, is a leading Higher EdTech platform dedicated to empowering the career growth of aspiring learners by equipping them with skills to rise in a competitive world. TimesPro’s H.EdTech programmes are created to meet the rapidly changing industry requirements and have been blended with technology to make them accessible & affordable.

    TimesPro offers a variety of created and curated learning programmes across a range of categories, industries, and age groups. They include employment-oriented early career programmes across BFSI, e-Commerce, and technology sectors; executive education for working professionals in collaboration with premier educational institutions like IIMs and IITs; and organisational learning and development interventions at the corporate level.

    TimesPro also collaborates with India’s leading MNCs across varied sectors to provide upskilling and reskilling solutions to boost employability and create a robust workforce. TimesPro is a Higher EdTech initiative by the Times of India Group.

    स्रोत : economictimes.indiatimes.com

    NEP allows schools to teach in mother tongue, but parents wonder which language it will be

    Even before schools figure out a way to implement the new policy, parents have started questioning it while experts are divided on whether it is a beneficial move or not.

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    NEP allows schools to teach in mother tongue, but parents wonder which language it will be

    NEP allows schools to teach in mother tongue, but parents wonder which language it will be Even before schools figure out a way to implement the new policy, parents have started questioning it while experts are divided on whether it is a beneficial move or not.

    Kritika Sharma

    1 August, 2020 11:16 am IST

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    Children attend an open-air school in Budgam, J&K | Representational image: ANI

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    New Delhi: One of the biggest talking points to emerge out of the new National Education Policy released Wednesday is having the ‘mother tongue’ as the medium of instruction up to class 5.

    The NEP states: “Wherever possible, students till Class 5 in schools should be taught in mother tongue/regional language/local language.” The idea is drawn from various studies that show young children best understand things in their mother tongue or home language.

    Officials in the Ministry of Human Resource Development insist that “no language will be imposed”. “The idea behind mother-tongue teaching is not to stop, hamper English-medium teaching. There is a line in the policy document that says teachers can be bi-lingual with their medium of instruction,” a senior ministry official said.

    The NEP, in its current shape, is only an instructional document and the government will have to come up with a way to implement it in the coming days.

    However, even before schools figure out a way to implement this new policy, parents have started questioning it, while experts have given mixed responses.

    Also read: NEP finally gives regional language its due. I suffered English-medium school snobbery

    Issues galore

    Krishnika Bhattacharjee, a parent whose daughter studies in Class 2 in a Mumbai school said: “My mother tongue is Bengali and my daughter goes to a school where her classmates come from various cultural backgrounds — there are children whose parents speak Tamil, there is a Kashmiri girl … So how will the school decide what tongue to teach in?

    “Living in Mumbai, everyone speaks Marathi as a local language, but we don’t speak it at home. So how will my child be taught?”

    Kavita Phandse, also from Mumbai, whose child studies in Class 5, added: “What is the point of an English medium school if children are taught in their mother tongue? I mean it’s good to explain the concepts to them in a language they best understand, but if teaching happens in the local language, when will my child learn English? You cannot grow and prosper in today’s world without learning English.”

    Those who studied in regional languages till Class 5 in the past say this new policy will be a bigger problem for underprivileged families or those who don’t speak English at home.

    Jessie Joseph from Ernakulam, Kerala, said: “I studied in a Malayalam medium school till Class 4. I learnt my first English alphabets in Class 5 and will not shy away from saying that I did have issues picking up English later in my life. My parents are both Malayalam speakers, so I did not have that environment at home.”

    Also read: Coming soon: BCom, BTech, MBBS in Telugu, Bengali & all Indian languages

    A successful model

    Those who applaud the idea of teaching in the mother tongue at a young age have cited the example of Sardar Patel Vidyalaya (SPV) in New Delhi as a model of success — the school is Hindi-medium till Class 5 and then switches to English in the higher classes.

    “My children studied in SPV and they were taught in Hindi till Class 5; they learnt maths, science, everything in Hindi. But that did not mean they were not learning the English translations of those words. They were taught that as well,” said Yugandhara Pawar Jha.

    “Their transition from Hindi-medium to English-medium was not a difficult one. In fact, I would say that teaching in the mother tongue during the early days is not a bad idea. A child is able to understand things better that way,” Jha said.

    An alumnus of SPV who did not wish to be named added that in families where English is spoken at home, there wouldn’t be a problem. “We spoke English at home, so I did not have much of a problem in transitioning after Class 5. In fact, most of my classmates did not … they all came from families that could provide them an environment where they learnt English,” the alumnus said.

    Also read: Even China dropped English phobia for economic future. NEP policy needs to learn this

    Experts divided

    Swaraj India president Yogendra Yadav, who has helped the NCERT prepare political science textbooks, has hailed the idea as the “best way to teach”.

    “Instruction in mother tongue is something that has always existed in every policy document, and it should be hailed. Every researcher will agree that teaching students in their mother tongue is the best way to teach,” Yadav said.

    Many schools in India, mostly in metropolitan cities and tier-two cities, use English as a medium of instruction, but Yadav said instead of that, it should be taught as a language.

    स्रोत : theprint.in

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