if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    ravana used to play which musical instrument with keen interest

    Mohammed

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get ravana used to play which musical instrument with keen interest from screen.

    Q. Ravana used to play which musical instrument with keen interest?

    Ravana was an extraordinary Veena player as it is believed that he had a keen interest in music.

    Sign Up

    Share & Earn With Mocamboo.

    Home Trending Videos Loved Account

    October 6, 2021

    Q. Ravana used to play which musical instrument with keen interest?

    Ravana was an extraordinary Veena player as it is believed that he had a keen interest in music.

    Views: 337

    Share this:

    WhatsAppTelegramTwitter

    #2021dussehra #2021dussehradate #dussehra #dussehra2021 #dussehra2021dates #dussehradate2021 #dussehramela2021 #dussehrapuja2021 #happydussehra2021 #vijayadashami2021 #whenisdussehra2021

    Dussehra 2021 • 363 days ago

    21 Posts • 0 Followers

    Suggestions For You

    mcx one

    • 200029 Followers Follow

    finance guru

    • 54013 Followers Follow

    breaking news

    • 3 Followers Follow

    Bollywood news

    • 2 Followers Follow

    crypto world

    • 17 Followers Follow

    great goal

    • 0 Followers Follow

    fashionbaba

    • 185227 Followers Follow

    Mark-Advisory

    • 8 Followers Follow

    Stock Power

    • 7 Followers Follow

    Raman Kumar Verma

    • 14 Followers Follow

    StockMarbles.com

    • 6 Followers Follow

    Viraj-Advisors

    • 3 Followers Follow

    Related Posts

    Mahatma Gandhi

    Happy Gandhi Jayanti !

    October 1, 2022 Mahatma Gandhi

    गाँधी जयंती कि शुभकामनाएं !

    October 1, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra! September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    दशहरा की शुभकामनाएं 2022 !

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    दशहरा की शुभकामनाएं!

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra 2022 1

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Have a warm Dussehra!

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra 2022 !

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    दशहरा की शुभकामनाएं!

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    दशहरा की शुभकामनाएं!

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra 2022 !

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra! September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Jai Shri Ram Happy Dussehra!

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra! September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra ! September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Virtual Dussehra Celebration !

    September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    Happy Dussehra ! September 27, 2022 Dussehra 2022

    स्रोत : www.mocamboo.com

    Ravana’s fiddle

    Ravana’s fiddle

    M. Lalitha M. Nandini

    AUGUST 06, 2015 15:19 IST

    UPDATED: MARCH 29, 2016 13:34 IST

    As an introduction, violinist-researcher Dr. M. Lalitha writes:

    I was selected for the Ministry of Culture, New Delhi,’s award under the Production Grant. Being an instrumentalist, I wanted to focus on divine musical instruments as suggested by my guide, Nandini Ramani. Along with my sister, M. Nandini, I began working on this project. The highlight was a comparative study of similar instruments all over the globe and how they are all connected with divinity, rituals and deities.

    We worked on the history and evolution of an instrument, mythological, sculptural evidences, its usage in temple rituals, similarities in global musical cultures, and took references from literature, from both Sanskrit and Tamil, such as the Vedas, Natyasastra, Periyapuranam and Silappadigaram.

    Nandini and I hail from a family of musicians. Our grandfather V. Lakshminarayana Iyer was an accomplished musician-composer and our uncles, L. Vaidyanathan, L. Subramanian and L. Shenkar are names to reckon with in the violin world. We have been awarded with several National and International Fellowships including the prestigious Fulbright Fellowships in Performing Arts - USA, Fulbright Nehru lecture Fellowship -USA, The Occasional Lecture Fund Award -USA, Charles Wallace Trust Fellowship – UK and were selected as Cultural Ambassadors to the U.S. and the U.K. respectively.

    We begin with Ravanhatha, a two stringed fiddle.

    THE RAVANHATHA

    We were in Jodhpur for a concert where we managed to shop for traditional Meenakari jhumkas and colourful dhurries. A visit to the Umaid Bhavan palace was a peep into the past and took us back to the old world of kings and kingdoms.

    We also visited the Mehrangarh Fort, regarded as one of the largest forts in India. The museum there houses a huge collection of royal exhibits including palanquins, watches, silver swords studded with precious stones such as emeralds and rubies. The exhibits included the swords of Akbar the Great, the royal outfits worn by the monarchs of Marwar and distinct Marwar paintings.

    As we took the lift to go to the different floors, we were captivated by the gentle strains of music which created an aura of the past in the old fort. The instrument being played was a stringed–bowed instrument that resembled the primitive coconut-shell violin. On speaking to one of them, we learnt that this instrument was the Ravanhatha, a two stringed fiddle popular in both Western India and Sri Lanka.

    We also learnt that it is made of coconut shell and covered with a goat’s hide. There is a fingerboard made of bamboo attached to the shell where two main strings made of steel and horsehair are seen passing through a small bridge. The string made up of horse hair is used to play the melody while the metal string is used as a drone. There are two huge pegs to which these two strings are attached. Apart from these two strings, there are more than 8-12 sympathetic strings attached to the small pegs. The bow is a bit concave and has jingle bells fitted that provide rhythmic accompaniment.

    This bowed, stringed instrument also known as Ravanhatta, Ravanahastha and Ravanastron, is said to have originated during the time of Ravana, the mighty king of Lanka. According to mythology, Ravana was an ardent devotee of Lord Siva. He played on the Ravanhatta as a musical offering to the Lord. It is believed that at the end of the war between Lord Rama and Ravana, Hanuman took the Ravanhatha to North India.

    Ravanhatha is said to be the precursor to the violin. The beautiful strains of Ravanhatha can be heard in Rajasthan in their lilting folk music. It is said that the royals of Rajasthan and Gujarat popularised this instrument where this became the first musical instrument to be taught to the princes of royal families as well as among the women.

    It is a main accompanying instrument used by the Bhopas, the priest singers of the folk deities in Rajasthan. They sing of the tales of the folk deity, Pabuji, who lived in Rajasthan during the 14th century. The Bhopas belong to the Nayak community and usually depict the tale of Pabuji in front of the Phad/ Par which is a painted canvas about 15-30 ft. long and 4-5 ft. deep where paintings depict the life of Pabuji.

    The Phads or Pars are painted by citero or professional painters. These Phads or paintings are drawn on a cotton cloth and treated with utmost reverence by the Bhopas. The epic of Pabuji is sung by both the Bhopa and the Bhopi – the wife of the Bhopa who holds a lamp near the Phad as the narration is in progress. The Phad is practically a movable temple and the story is only narrated in the night. The singing is interspersed with dancing too. The epic of Pabuji has about 4,000 lines and its performance lasts for full five nights of eight hours duration from dusk to dawn.

    The melodic strains of the Ravanhatha still fill the desert State with vibrancy.

    Our code of editorial values

    Related Topics musicFriday Review

    NRI in Turkey? Invest ₹18K/Month & Get ₹1Cr for your kids College in 15 years.

    NRI Investment Plan!

    | Sponsored

    Bu yılki ABD YEŞİL KART ÇEKİLİŞİ KAYDINI kaçırmayın!

    स्रोत : www.thehindu.com

    Ravanahatha

    Ravanahatha

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to navigation Jump to search

    Indian Ravanhatha at the Casa Museo Del Timple, Lanzarote, Spain.

    A ravanahatha (variant names: , , , ) is an ancient bowed, stringed instrument, used in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and surrounding areas. It has been suggested as an ancestor of the violin.[1]

    Contents

    1 Construction 2 History 3 Modern use 4 References 5 External links

    Construction[edit]

    Man playing Ravanahatha in Jaisalmer, India

    The ravanahatha's sound box may be a gourd, a halved coconut shell or hollowed-out cylinder of wood, with a membrane of stretched goat or other hide. A neck of wood or bamboo is attached, carrying between one and four or more peg-tuned strings of gut, hair or steel, strung over a bridge. Some examples may have several sympathetic strings. The bow is usually of horsehair; examples vary in length.

    History[edit]

    In Indian tradition, the ravanahatha is believed to have originated among the Hela people of Lanka during the time of the legendary king Ravana, after whom the instrument is supposedly named. According to legend, Ravana used the ravanahatha in his devotions to the Hindu God Shiva.[2] In the Hindu Ramayana epic, after the war between Rama and Ravana, Hanuman returned to North India with a ravanahatha. The ravanahatha is particularly popular among street musicians in Rajasthan, North India.

    Throughout the history of Medieval India, the kings were patrons of music; this helped in increased popularity of the ravanhatha among royal families. In Rajasthan and Gujarat, it was the first musical instrument to be learned by princes. The tradition of Rajasthan further helped in popularizing among women.[]

    Some sources claim that between the seventh and tenth centuries AD, Arab traders brought the ravanastron from India to the Near East, where it provided the basic model for the Arab rebab, and other early ancestors of the violin family.[3][4]

    Modern use[edit]

    Dinesh Subasinghe showing his new version of the ravanahatha to Mahinda Rajapaksa

    In modern times, the instrument has been revived by Sri Lankan composer and violinist Dinesh Subasinghe and used in several of his compositions, including and the Buddhist oratorio .[5][6]

    The European experimental folk band Heilung also make use of the ravanahatha, in two of their albums and .

    References[edit]

    ^ Heron-Allen, Edward (1885). . Ward, Lock, and Co. pp. 37–42. Retrieved 29 June 2017 – via Internet Archive (archive.org) facsimile of Cornell University Press copy. As it was and is, being a historical, theoretical, and practical treatise on the science and art of violin-making, for the use of violin makers and players, amateur and professional^ "Sri Lankan revives Ravana's musical instrument". . Sri Lanka. 9 March 2008.^ Heron-Allen, Edward, , Ward, Lock, and Co., 1885, pp. 37-42 Archive.org facsimile of Cornell University Press copy (accessed 29 June 2017)^ Choudhary, S.Dhar (2010). . Ramakrisna Vedanta Math. ISBN 978-9380568065. Retrieved 5 September 2015.^ Balachandran, P.K. (7 February 2011). "A musical instrument played by Ravana himself!". Entertainment. . Retrieved 1 May 2013.^ "Dinesh records highest sale for an instrumental". . Sri Lanka. 8 March 2015. Retrieved 16 July 2015.

    External links[edit]

    Media related to Ravanahatha at Wikimedia Commons

    Authority control

    MusicBrainz instrument

    Categories: Bowed string instrumentsIndian musical instrumentsSri Lankan musical instrumentsEarly musical instruments

    स्रोत : en.wikipedia.org

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    Mohammed 2 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer