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    ...............replaces a part of the identified resource with the request data.

    Mohammed

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    HTTP request methods

    HTTP defines a set of request methods to indicate the desired action to be performed for a given resource. Although they can also be nouns, these request methods are sometimes referred to as HTTP verbs. Each of them implements a different semantic, but some common features are shared by a group of them: e.g. a request method can be safe, idempotent, or cacheable.

    HTTP request methods

    HTTP defines a set of request methods to indicate the desired action to be performed for a given resource. Although they can also be nouns, these request methods are sometimes referred to as HTTP verbs. Each of them implements a different semantic, but some common features are shared by a group of them: e.g. a request method can be safe, idempotent, or cacheable.

    GET

    The GET method requests a representation of the specified resource. Requests using GET should only retrieve data.

    HEAD

    The HEAD method asks for a response identical to a GET request, but without the response body.

    POST

    The POST method submits an entity to the specified resource, often causing a change in state or side effects on the server.

    PUT

    The PUT method replaces all current representations of the target resource with the request payload.

    DELETE

    The DELETE method deletes the specified resource.

    CONNECT

    The CONNECT method establishes a tunnel to the server identified by the target resource.

    OPTIONS

    The OPTIONS method describes the communication options for the target resource.

    TRACE

    The TRACE method performs a message loop-back test along the path to the target resource.

    PATCH

    The PATCH method applies partial modifications to a resource.

    Specifications

    Specification HTTP Semantics # CONNECT HTTP Semantics # DELETE HTTP Semantics # GET HTTP Semantics # HEAD HTTP Semantics # OPTIONS HTTP Semantics # POST HTTP Semantics # PUT HTTP Semantics # TRACE

    Browser compatibility

    Report problems with this compatibility data on GitHub

    desktop mobile Chrome Edge Firefox Opera Safari Chrome Android Firefox for Android Opera Android Safari on iOS Samsung Internet WebView Android CONNECT DELETE GET HEAD OPTIONS POST PUT TRACE

    Legend

    Tip: you can click/tap on a cell for more information.

    Full support Full support

    Compatibility unknown

    Compatibility unknown

    See also

    HTTP headers

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    Last modified: Sep 9, 2022, by MDN contributors

    स्रोत : developer.mozilla.org

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    I'm seeing a good bit of hand-waving on the subject of how to update only part of a resource (eg. status indicator) using REST. The options seem to be: Complain that HTTP doesn't have a PATCH or ...

    REST - Modify Part of Resource - PUT or POST

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    Asked 12 years, 7 months ago

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    I'm seeing a good bit of hand-waving on the subject of how to update only part of a resource (eg. status indicator) using REST.

    The options seem to be:

    Complain that HTTP doesn't have a PATCH or MODIFY command. However, the accepted answer on HTTP MODIFY verb for REST? does a good job of showing why that's not as good an idea as it might seem.

    Use POST with parameters and identify a method (eg. a parameter named "action"). Some suggestions are to specify an X-HTTP-Method-Override header with a self-defined method name. That seems to lead to the ugliness of switching within the implementation based on what you're trying to do, and to be open to the criticism of not being a particularly RESTful way to use POST. In fact, taking this approach starts to feel like an RPC-type interface.

    Use PUT to over-write a sub-resource of the resource which represents the specific attribute(s) to update. In fact, this is effectively an over-write of the sub-resource, which seems in line with the spirit of PUT.

    At this point, I see #3 as the most reasonable option.

    Is this a best practice or an anti-pattern? Are there other options?

    httpresthttp-headershttp-verbs

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    edited May 23, 2017 at 12:19

    CommunityBot 11 1 silver badge

    asked Feb 5, 2010 at 15:41

    Jacob Zwiers 1,0721 1 gold badge 13 13 silver badges 33 33 bronze badges Add a comment

    6 Answers

    7

    There are two ways to view a status update.

    Update to a thing. That's a PUT. Option 3

    Adding an additional log entry to the history of the thing. The list item in this sequence of log entries is the current status. That's a POST. Option 2.

    If you're a data warehousing or functional programming type, you tend to be mistrustful of status changes, and like to POST a new piece of historical fact to a static, immutable thing. This does require distinguishing the thing from the history of the thing; leading to two tables.

    Otherwise, you don't mind an "update" to alter the status of a thing and you're happy with a PUT. This does not distinguish between the thing and it's history, and keeps everything in one table.

    Personally, I'm finding that I'm less and less trustful of mutable objects and PUT's (except for "error correction"). (And even then, I think the old thing can be left in place and the new thing added with a reference to the previous version of itself.)

    If there's a status change, I think there should be a status log or history and there should be a POST to add a new entry to that history. There may be some optimization to reflect the "current" status in the object to which this applies, but that's just behind-the-scenes optimization.

    Share Improve this answer

    edited Feb 5, 2010 at 15:59

    answered Feb 5, 2010 at 15:50

    S.Lott 376k78 78 gold badges 503 503 silver badges 771 771 bronze badges

    Thanks for the reply. I should have been more selective about the example I used (i.e. status update). The problem I'm tackling is more general that just statuses. And, where it is a status I'm updating, it's really an update to show that the receiving system is in the process of working on the resource (like a confirmation). I'll be putting error checking to define allowable state transitions for the field. So, really, my situation fits your #1 (which is the original #3). –

    Jacob Zwiers

    Feb 5, 2010 at 17:56

    If your data model doesn't have history, then, an update is the common fall-back plan. If you're still building, however, consider keeping history. As an optimization, duplicating the most recent history in the thing itself. –

    S.Lott

    Feb 5, 2010 at 18:05

    Great answer. Question: Would you consider it incorrect for PUT to update the state of the resource and for that to trigger a log entry that it is changed? Since GET calls can and do create log entries and that has been justified in that logging is an internal concern wouldn't logging on PUT be appropriate? That would allow retaining the idempotent nature of PUT except when that state has been changed by an API call from another client and so logging would seem appropriate for that. No? –

    MikeSchinkel

    Jun 22, 2016 at 2:13

    Add a comment 5

    Option 3 (PUT to some separated sub-resource) is your best bet right now, and it wouldn't necessarily be "wrong" to just use POST on the main resource itself - although you could disagree with that depending on how pedantic you want to be about it.

    Stick with 3 and use more granular sub-resources, and if you really do have a need for PATCH-like behavior - use POST. Personally, I will still use this approach even if PATCH does actually end up as a viable option.

    Share Improve this answer

    edited Feb 9, 2010 at 1:41

    answered Feb 5, 2010 at 15:50

    Mike 3,3421 1 gold badge 16 16 silver badges 15 15 bronze badges Add a comment 5

    HTTP does have a PATCH command. It is defined in Section 19.6.1.1 of RFC 2068, and was updated in draft-dusseault-http-patch-16, currently awaiting publication as RFC.

    स्रोत : stackoverflow.com

    HTTP Request Methods – Get vs Put vs Post Explained with Code Examples

    In this article, we'll be discussing the get, put, and post HTTP methods. You'll learn what each HTTP method is used for as well as why we use them. In order to get a deep understanding of how HTTP methods work, I'll also go over key context and background

    JANUARY 26, 2022 / #HTTP

    HTTP Request Methods – Get vs Put vs Post Explained with Code Examples

    Camila Ramos Garzon

    In this article, we'll be discussing the get, put, and post HTTP methods. You'll learn what each HTTP method is used for as well as why we use them.

    In order to get a deep understanding of how HTTP methods work, I'll also go over key context and background information.

    Topics we'll cover in this post:

    HTTP Protocol

    Client-server architecture

    APIs

    By the end of this article you'll have a good understanding of the functions of each request method. You'll also have experience making requests and working with a web API.

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    What is HTTP?

    HTTP is a protocol, or a definite set of rules, for accessing resources on the web. Resources could mean anything from HTML files to data from a database, photos, text, and so on.

    These resources are made available to us via an API and we make requests to these APIs via the HTTP protocol. API stands for application programming interface. It is the mechanism that allows developers to request resources.

    Client-Server Architecture

    In order to understand the HTTP methods, it’s important to cover the concept of client/server architecture. This architecture describes how all web applications work and defines the rules for how they communicate.

    A client application is the one that a user is actually interacting with, that's displaying the content. A server application is the one that sends the content, or resource, to your client application. A server application is a program that is running somewhere, listening, and waiting for a request.

    The main reason for this separation is to secure sensitive information. Your entire client application gets downloaded into the browser, and all of the data can be accessed by anyone accessing your web page.

    This architecture helps protect things like your API keys, personal data, and more. Now modern tools like Next.js and Netlify allow developers to run server code in the same app as their client app, without needing a dedicated server application.

    Client-Server Communication

    Client and server applications communicate by sending individual messages on an as-needed basis, rather than an ongoing stream of communication.

    These communications are almost always initiated by clients in the form of requests. These requests are fulfilled by the server application which sends back a response containing the resource you requested, among other things.

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    Why We Need A Server-Client Architecture

    Let’s say you were building a weather web app, for example. The weather app that your user is going to interact with is the client application – it has buttons, a search bar, and displays data like city name, current temperature, AQI, and so on.

    This weather app wouldn’t have every city and its weather information coded directly into it. This would make the app bloated and slow, would take forever to research and manually add to a database, and would be a headache to update every single day.

    Instead, the app can access weather data by city using the Weather web API. Your app would gather your user’s location and then make a request to the server saying, “Hey, send me the weather information for this specific city.”

    Depending on what you are trying to achieve, you would use the various request methods that are available. The server sends back a response containing the weather information and a few other things, depending on how the API is written. It may also send back things like a timestamp, the region this city is located in, and more.

    Your client application communicated with a server application running somewhere, whose only job is to listen continuously for a request to that address. When it receives a request, it works to fulfill that request either by reading from a database, another API, local file, or a programmatic calculation based on data you pass in.

    The Anatomy of an HTTP Request

    An HTTP request must have the following:

    An HTTP method (like GET)

    A host URL (like https://api.spotify.com/)

    An endpoint path(like  v1/artists/{id}/related-artists)

    A request can also optionally have:

    Body Headers Query strings HTTP version

    The Anatomy of an HTTP Response

    A response must have the following:

    Protocol version (like HTTP/1.1)

    Status code (like  200)

    Status text (OK) Headers

    A response may also optionally have:

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    HTTP Methods Explained

    Now that we know what HTTP is and why it’s used, let’s talk about the different methods we have available to us.

    In the weather app example above, we wanted to retrieve weather information about a city. But what if we wanted to submit weather information for a city?

    In real life, you probably wouldn’t have permissions to alter someone else’s data, but let’s imagine that we are contributors to a community-run weather app. And in addition to getting the weather information from an API, members in that city could update this information to display more accurate data.

    Or what if we wanted to add a new city altogether that, for some reason, doesn’t already exist in our database of cities? These are all different functions – retrieve data, update data, create new data – and there are HTTP methods for all of these.

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    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

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