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    somu went to the gym today. he decided to do xx sets of squats. each set consists of 1515 squats. determine the total number of squats that he did today.

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    Squad codechef solution

    Squad codechef solution Somu went to the gym today. He decided to do XX sets of squats. Each set consists of 1515 squats. Determine the total number of squats that he did today. Input Format The first line contains a single integer TT — the number of test cases. Then the test cases follow. The first and only line of each

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    Squad Codechef Solution

    By Stardevilm November 23, 2022 7

    Squad Codechef Solution

    Somu went to the gym today. He decided to do XX sets of squats. Each set consists of 1515 squats. Determine the total number of squats that he did today.

    Input Format

    The first line contains a single integer TT — the number of test cases. Then the test cases follow.

    The first and only line of each test case contains an integer XX — the total number of sets of squats that Somu did.

    Output Format

    For each test case, output the total number of squats done by Somu.

    Squad Codechef Solution

    1 \leq T \leq 10001≤T≤1000

    1 \leq X \leq 10^51≤X≤105

    Sample 1:

    Input Output 3 1 4 99 15 60 1485

    Explanation:

    Test Case 1: Since, he does only 11 set of squats, the total number of squats done by him is 1515.Test Case 2: Since, he does 44 sets of squats, the total number of squats is 15 + 15 + 15 + 15 = 6015+15+15+15=60.

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    स्रोत : theshortstoryguy.com

    Squat Challenge: 'I Did Squats Every Day And This Is What Happened'

    Squat challenges are no mean feat - WH's Junior Fitness Editor took on the challenge of squats everyday – and learnt some interesting things.

    We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

    Squat Challenge: 'I Did Squats Every Day For 2 Weeks, Here Are 5 Really Surprising Things I Learnt'

    Easy peasy, right? Not

    BY KIRSTI BUICK 15 FEB 2022

    A squat challenge without weights. Easy peasy, right? I've been strength training for about 7 years now, and squats are probably the move I've done the most. Pre-lockdown I was managing some decent numbers on a barbell and when home workouts became my new MO, high-rep sets of squats with 8kg dumbbells were in regular rotation, so a serious squat challenge didn't seem all that intimidating.

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    Then I caught Covid-19 in early December (2021). Thankfully, I recovered without medical help and haven't really had any lingering symptoms, aside from a bit of fatigue. On the advice of the experts I had the pleasure of talking to for an article on how to exercise after Covid-19, I gave myself about a month of full rest, and eased back in with walks, Pilates and yoga, before getting into said squat challenge.

    'Reframe it as prehab for your return to exercise,' Dr Rebecca Robinson, consultant in sports and exercise medicine at the Centre for Health and Human Performance (CHHP), advised me, and I took it to heart.

    With my strength gone from hero to (almost) zero in the few weeks I spent recovering, I knew this was the perfect time to get back to everyday resistance training fundamentals, so a squat challenge was just what I was after. Let's take a closer look at this PT go-to.

    Why do PTs love squat challenges so much?

    'The squat is such a popular strength movement as it involves several muscles and joints working together to make it happen,' says personal trainer (and my new squat spirit guide) Sam McGowan. 'There are only a few [compound] movements that have such an effect.'

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    What are the benefits of a squat challenge (or just regular squats)?

    Where to start? Increased exercise performance, reduced risk of injury and serious strength gains are just the tip of the iceberg, Sam tells me.

    'Using both upper, lower and core muscles throughout the squat will help you not just with day-to-day activities such as walking, climbing stairs, lifting, bending or carrying but it will also help us with our physical performance.'

    Love that for me. As I eased back into slow and steady strength workouts, my squat challenge officially began and I committed to doing 3 sets of 10 reps of squats every day for 2 weeks. 420 squats, eh? Nothing to be sneezed at.

    This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    View this post on Instagram

    A post shared by Kirsti Lang (@itsmekirsti)

    5 things I learnt from my squat challenge

    1. DOMs aren't a great indicator of success

    On day 1 of Mission Squat Challenge, I managed 3 sets of bodyweight squats without too many problems despite having taken a few weeks off. But the following morning... Wow. My quads, glutes and hamstrings – my quads in particular – were feeling it.

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    That means I did good, right?

    Not quite, says Sam. 'Soreness isn’t necessarily the sign of a good workout so if you feel that your quads burn more than your glutes, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re not working those bum muscles.'

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), while it can be a literal pain in the ass on occasion, can often leave you feeling quite satisfied with your workout. But here's the rub: DOMs ≠ gains. Studies have shown that muscle soreness doesn’t need to occur for muscle growth, and as a regular exerciser, your body will have adapted enough to cope with the demands you’re placing on it. In short, DOMS will occur less and less.

    In other words, it's likely my muscles were complaining more for lack of use than actual gains. And sure enough, by day 4 or 5 of my squat challenge, I stopped getting them. My body was adapting fast.

    2. I've been sacrificing technique for depth

    I have pretty decent mobility in my hips and knees, and the depth of my squat has always been a source of pride (yes, I'm one of those people). But when I mention it to Sam (#humblebrag) she preaches caution.

    RELATED STORIES

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    'Squat depth is not as important as proper technique,' she says. 'Yes, you could force your "ass-to-the-grass" and that would mean you’re completing the full range of motion – but it’s also quite likely your technique has gone out of the window. Your lower back may have rounded and your hips tucked under.'

    स्रोत : www.womenshealthmag.com

    How Many Squats Should I Do? Daily Routine and 30

    Good things come to those who squat. Not only do squats shape your quads, hamstrings, and glutes, they help your balance and mobility, and increase your strength. We'll walk you through how to do a basic squat and three variations so you can get to work. We even created a 30-day squat challenge just for you.

    How Many Squats Should I Do a Day? A Beginner’s Guide

    Medically reviewed by Daniel Bubnis, M.S., NASM-CPT, NASE Level II-CSS, Fitness — By Nicole Davis — Updated on June 15, 2018

    Share on Pinterest How to get started

    Good things come to those who squat.

    Not only will squats shape your quads, hamstrings, and glutes, they’ll also help your balance and mobility, and increase your strength. In fact, a 2002 study found that the deeper your squat, the more your glutes will work. Convinced yet?

    When it comes to how many squats you should do in a day, there’s no magic number — it really depends on your individual goals. If you’re new to doing squats, aim for 3 sets of 12-15 reps of at least one type of squat. Practicing a few days a week is a great place to start.

    Below, we’ve mapped out the basic squat and three variations of it so you can get to work.

    1. The basic squat

    You’d be hard-pressed to find a more fundamental exercise than the basic squat. When performed properly, it engages the largest muscles in the body to provide many functional and aesthetic benefits. In case you were wondering, squats will definitely help lift and round out your butt.

    To get moving:

    Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, resting your arms down at your sides.

    While bracing your core and keeping your chest up and neck neutral, bend your knees and push your hips back as if you’re going to sit in a chair. Your arms should raise up in front of you to be parallel to the floor.

    When your thighs are parallel to the floor, pause. Then push up through your heels back to your starting position.

    2. The curtsy squat

    A favorite to really target the glutes, curtsy squats will have you feeling fancy AF.

    When you can knock 10 of these out on each side without breaking a sweat, up your game by holding a dumbbell in each hand.

    To get moving:

    Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart. Hold your arms in a comfortable position. You can rest your hands on your hips or keep them down at your sides.

    With a strong core, step back and across with your right foot until your left thigh is parallel to the floor. Ensure that your chest and chin stay upright throughout this movement.

    After a brief pause, push up through the heel of your planted left foot and return to your starting position.

    Repeat, but step back with your left foot instead. When you finish this side, you’ve completed one rep.

    3. The split squat

    Similar to a lunge, the split squat requires a split stance, isolating one leg at a time. This will require more balance, so really focus on that as you’re in motion.

    To get moving:

    Start in a wide-staggered stance, with your right leg in front and your left leg behind.

    Keep your arms down at your sides. If you need an added challenge, hold a light dumbbell in each hand.

    While keeping your chest up and core braced, bend your knees until your left knee nearly touches the floor and your right thigh is parallel to the floor. Ensure that your right knee doesn’t extend past your toes.

    After a short pause, return to your starting position. Repeat your desired number of right-leg reps, then switch your stagger to complete your left-leg reps.

    4. The goblet squat

    Strength and conditioning coach Dan John created this move to help people who have trouble mastering squats or experience pain during the basic squat movement.

    Equipment: A dumbbell. Start light with 10 pounds if you’re a beginner.

    To get moving:

    Begin by grabbing your dumbbell by one end, allowing the other end to hang toward the floor, with your hands cupped.

    With bent elbows, hold the dumbbell comfortably in front of you, touching your chest. Your stance should be wide and your toes should be pointed out.

    Bend your knees and start to push your hips back, keeping the dumbbell stationary. Keep your neck neutral and gaze straight ahead. If your range of motion allows for it, your thighs can go deeper than parallel to the floor.

    After a slight pause, push through your heels and return to your starting position.

    Want more? Try our 30-day squat challenge

    After you master these squat variations, up your game with this 30-day squat challenge. Remember, 1 set should equal about 12-15 reps when you start out. You’ll be doing 3 sets of the specified squat — so grab your water and get ready.

    For a higher intensity workout, you can add a few reps or grab some dumbbells when you hit week 3, or day 15.

    Share on Pinterest Things to consider

    Make sure you’ve warmed up before you start squatting. Doing at least 10 minutes of cardio and 5 minutes of stretching will loosen up your muscles, increase your range of motion, and help prevent injury.

    The number of squats you should do has nothing to do with your gender and everything to do with your fitness level. Be mindful of your limits and make sure your form is solid before adding additional reps or weight.

    स्रोत : www.healthline.com

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    Mohammed 8 day ago
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