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    tell us about a situation in which you saw an opportunity in a potential problem. what did you do? what was the result?

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    Problems Are Just Opportunities in Disguise

    How to Show That Problems Are Just Opportunities in Disguise Behavioral Interview Question: Describe a situation in which you recognized a potential problem as an opportunity. What did you do? What was the result? What, if anything, do you wish you had done differently? Every business has problems both large and small and employees play a huge role in identifying and solving those problems. Think back to all your work experiences and it shouldn’t be too hard to find an example of where you saw a problem in the workplace. You may not have single handedly solved the problem, but even if you just flagged it to your manager you played a key part in arriving at a good solution. This is an excellent opportunity for you to share a contribution you made to the company. But the key here is finding a “problem” that is a real problem, and showing that you made a very real contribution. Here’s an example: “At COMPANY we were developing software to help market researchers create surveys quickly and easily. We also took on surveys that researchers wanted to outsource, and I was in charge of creating those surveys. As I was building the […]

    Problems Are Just Opportunities in Disguise

    PROBLEM SOLVING

    How to Show That Problems Are Just Opportunities in Disguise

    Behavioral Interview Question: Describe a situation in which you recognized a potential problem as an opportunity. What did you do? What was the result? What, if anything, do you wish you had done differently?

    Every business has problems both large and small and employees play a huge role in identifying and solving those problems. Think back to all your work experiences and it shouldn’t be too hard to find an example of where you saw a problem in the workplace. You may not have single handedly solved the problem, but even if you just flagged it to your manager you played a key part in arriving at a good solution.

    This is an excellent opportunity for you to share a contribution you made to the company. But the key here is finding a “problem” that is a real problem, and showing that you made a very real contribution. Here’s an example:

    “At COMPANY we were developing software to help market researchers create surveys quickly and easily. We also took on surveys that researchers wanted to outsource, and I was in charge of creating those surveys. As I was building the survey, I noticed that creating the survey was challenging, because text had to be manually inputted into each question. I realized that researchers were probably struggling with the same problem, and asked the IT team if they could make a change so that text could be uploaded from a .csv document all at once. Once IT realized it wasn’t particularly difficult given the current software setup, I mentioned the idea to sales and they started using it as a tactic in their sales calls, because the ease of uploading questions in this way would help encourage researchers to buy the platform.”

    This example shows that you saw a problem (difficulty creating surveys), and found a solution that was not only easy to implement, but also a great sales tactic. It provided an opportunity for the company to sell to more researchers, and gave them a leg up on the competition.

    Look into your own past and see if there are any examples of:

    New Processes New Ideas

    New Products/Services

    New Hires/Positions

    If you’ve ever spoken up at meetings or talked about problems with your boss, there are likely contributions that you have made that impacted the company. Try to figure out if any of those exist, and what they may be.

    It is also helpful to understand your problem solving approach. There are 3 Types of Problem Solvers and employers want to know that you can be all three.

    Look over our post that describes all 3 approaches and use this information to better develop your reply to the behavioral question above.

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    स्रोत : everydayinterviewtips.com

    Behavioral competency

    Behavioral interview questions examples to prepare your next competency-based job interview. Look at the job description and see what skills are required.

    Behavioral interview questions

    Table of Contents

    Here are some examples of behavioral interview questions you may want to prepare your story answers for.

    ADAPTABILITY

    What does it mean?

    maintaining effectiveness in varying environments, tasks and responsibilities, or with various types of people

    being open to different ideas and perspectives

    making an effort to work effectively with others even though their preferred way of working is different from yours

    accepting that others may do things differently than you would

    showing flexibly when applying guidelines or procedures to get the job done and meet organizational objectives

    recognizing that certain situations require different approaches and reacting appropriately

    adjusting priorities and plans in response to changing circumstances

    enthusiastically adopting new systems or procedures

    Typical behavioral questions:

    Tell me about a situation in which you have had to adjust to changes over which you had no control. How did you handle it?

    Tell me about a time when you had to adjust to a classmate's or colleague's working style in order to complete a project or achieve your objectives.

    By providing examples, convince us that you can adapt to a wide variety of people, situations and environments.

    ANALYTICAL SKILLS & PROBLEM SOLVING

    What does it mean?

    relating and comparing data from different sources identifying issues, securing relevant information, identifying relationships and implementing solutions.

    ability to reach logical conclusions, solve problems, analyze factual information, and take action

    ability to define and prioritize objectives according to the intensity, direction and priority of desires or ambitions

    breaking-down problems into component parts

    thinking about the chain of events that led to a problem

    thinking ahead about the consequences of an action ("If I do A, then B, and C will also happen")

    thinking through a problem before offering a solution

    looking at the problem from different angles

    Typical behavioral questions:

    Describe the project or situation that best demonstrates your analytical abilities. What was your role?

    Tell me about a time when you had to analyze information and make a recommendation. To whom did you make the recommendation? What was your reasoning? What kind of thought process did you go through? Why?

    Tell me about a situation where you had to solve a difficult problem. What did you do? What was your thought process? What was the outcome?

    COMMUNICATION

    What does it mean?

    ability to clearly express ideas verbally or in writing

    recognizing underlying concerns or feelings that may not be openly expressed

    actively listening and allowing others an opportunity to fully express themselves

    thinking about how people will respond before you communicate your thoughts

    customizing responses to reflect audience differences

    checking understanding in ways that are appropriate to the audience

    Typical behavioral questions:

    Tell me about a recent successful experience in making a speech or presentation. How did you prepare? What obstacles did you face? How did you handle them?

    Have you ever had to "sell" an idea to your classmates or co-workers? Supervisor? How did you do it? Did they accept your idea?

    Tell me about a time in which you had to use your written communication skills in order to get an important point across. What was the outcome?

    Tell me about a situation when you had to convince (be assertive) in order to get a point across that was important to you.

    INTERPERSONAL SKILLS AND SENSITIVITY 

    What does it mean?

    acting out of consideration for the feelings and needs of others.

    Typical behavioral questions:

    Give an example of when you had to work with someone who was difficult to get along with. How/why was this person difficult? How did you handle it?

    Describe a situation where you found yourself dealing with someone who didn't like you. How did you handle it?

    Describe a recent unpopular decision you made. How did you handle it?

    Tell me about a time when you had to work on a team with someone you did not get along with. What happened? How did it affect the result

    Describe a situation where you had a conflict with another individual, and how you dealt with it. What was the outcome? How did you feel about it?

    Describe a situation in which you had to work with someone who you found very different in their needs and values. How did you feel about it?

    CREATIVITY

    What does it mean?

    ability to use imagination and originality to create or improve something

    questioning whether the current approach is still the best approach

    striving to come up with a number of different solutions to a problem

    looking at what other organizations are doing

    successfully and determining what you could transfer to your organization

    focusing on the value of finding new ideas and acting on them

    Typical behavioral questions:

    Tell me about a problem that you've solved in a unique or unusual way. What was the outcome? Were you and/or your boss happy or satisfied with it?

    Give me an example of when someone brought you a new idea that was odd or unusual. What did you do?

    स्रोत : www.starstorytelling.com

    8 Common Problem

    Learn about problem-solving interview questions, why employers ask them and some potential responses to these types of questions.

    8 Common Problem-Solving Interview Questions and Answers

    By Jamie Birt

    Updated July 22, 2022

    Published February 4, 2020

    Jamie Birt is a career coach with 5+ years of experience helping job seekers navigate the job search through one-to-one coaching, webinars and events. She’s motivated by the mission to help people find fulfillment and belonging in their careers.

    Related: 5 Competency Based Interview Questions (With Example Answers!)

    In this video, we'll explain a top-notch strategy for answering questions about your core competencies.

    If the job you're applying for requires you to think critically or solve problems, you may be asked some analytical interview questions. These problem-solving questions will vary across industries but are typically focused on your experiences analyzing a problem or situation and responding to it in a logical and effective manner. Familiarizing yourself with business problem-solving questions will help you prepare for this portion of the interview.

    In this article, we explore what problem-solving interview questions are and why employers ask them. Then we take a look at some of the most common problem-solving questions and provide guidance for answering these questions at your next interview.

    What are problem-solving interview questions?

    Problem-solving interview questions are questions that employers ask related to the candidate's ability to gather data, analyze a problem, weigh the pros and cons and reach a logical decision. Also known as analytical skills interview questions, these questions will often focus on specific instances when the candidate analyzed a situation or had to solve a problem, including what steps they took to gather and understand the necessary information before solving the problem.

    These types of questions help employers better understand how a candidate gathers information from various sources, uses critical thinking to evaluate information, makes decisions that help the business and communicates their findings or recommendations to team members. Employers ask these questions to gauge how candidates will address complex situations that they are likely to encounter on the job.

    Related: 125 Common Interview Questions and Answers (With Tips)

    Problem-solving questions with sample answers

    Let's take a look at a few of the most common problem-solving interview questions that you may encounter during an interview and some sample answers. When preparing for your interview, consider a few different examples of when you successfully solved a problem, including what the problem was, what steps you took to solve the problem and the outcome:

    When you are faced with a problem, what do you do?

    Describe a time when you faced an unexpected challenge at work.

    How do you weigh the pros and cons before making a decision?

    How would you handle a disgruntled or dissatisfied customer?

    What metrics do you track on a regular basis? How do you use the information to adjust your approach?

    Tell me about a time when you had to change your planned course of action at the last moment. How did you handle this situation?

    Your manager wants to buy new software to help increase the team's productivity, and she asks for your recommendation. How do you respond?

    Describe a time when you had to solve a problem, but didn't have all the necessary information about it beforehand. What did you do?

    1. When you are faced with a problem, what do you do?

    Tip: Employers typically ask this question to understand what your problem-solving process looks like. They are looking for you to describe a logical problem-solving process that includes gathering information, analyzing the information and making decisions based on what you've found.

    Example: “When I'm faced with a problem, I typically start by doing research or looking at examples of how this problem has been solved by others. From that research, I'm able to decide which approach to solving the problem works best for me and the organization. Then, I decide what actions need to be taken to solve the problem, and I start putting the process into motion while communicating with my managers and co-workers.”

    2. Tell me about a time when you faced an unexpected challenge at work.

    Tip: For this question, you'll want to choose a specific example from your work history to demonstrate your ability to be flexible while solving problems. To stay focused, you can use the STAR method to answer this question. Describe the situation, your role in the challenge, the action that you took to overcome this challenge and the final result.

    Example: “When I was working as a retail manager, I had a customer who came in to pick up a dress that she had ordered online. But when I went to collect her order, I found that the dress had accidentally been put back on the sales floor and purchased by another customer. I called another of our store locations and asked them to hold the same dress in the customer's size. I had it shipped to her home within 2 days for free. A week later, I found out that the customer had called our corporate headquarters to mention how much she appreciated the gesture.”

    Related: Top Tips for Using the STAR Method

    Taylor explains how to stand out when answering behavioral interview questions using the STAR Method, a strategic storytelling tool.

    3. How do you weigh the pros and cons before making a decision?

    स्रोत : www.indeed.com

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