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    what is the best way to protect your information when you are away from your computer

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    Keep your computer secure at home

    Get tips to help protect your home computer from scams, malware, viruses, and other online threats that might try steal your personal information.

    Keep your computer secure at home

    Security Windows 10 Windows 8.1 Windows 11 More...

    Keeping your computer secure helps you avoid malware and direct hacking attempts designed to steal your personal information. Here are some ways you can help reduce your online risk when you use your computer at home.

    Tips to protect your computer

    Use a firewall

    Windows has a firewall already built in and automatically turned on.

    Keep software up to date

    Make sure to turn on automatic updates in Windows Update to keep Windows, Microsoft Office, and other Microsoft applications up to date. Turn on automatic updates for non-Microsoft software as well, especially browsers, Adobe Acrobat Reader, and other apps you regularly use.

    Use antivirus software and keep it current

    If you run Windows you have Windows Security or Windows Defender Security Center already installed on your device.

    Tip: If you're a Microsoft 365 Family or Personal subscriber, you get Microsoft Defender included with your subscription at no extra charge. It helps protect all your devices - Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS. For more information see Getting started with Microsoft Defender.

    Make sure your passwords are well-chosen and protected

    To learn how, see Protect your passwords.

    Don’t open suspicious attachments or click unusual links in messages.

    They can appear in email, tweets, posts, online ads, messages, or attachments, and sometimes disguise themselves as known and trusted sources.

    Browse the web safely

    Avoid visiting sites that offer potentially illicit content. Many of these sites install malware on the fly or offer downloads that contain malware. Use a modern browser like Microsoft Edge, which can help block malicious websites and prevent malicious code from running on your computer.

    Stay away from pirated material

    Avoid streaming or downloading movies, music, books, or applications that do not come from trusted sources. They may contain malware.

    Don't use USBs or other external devices unless you own them

    To avoid infection by malware and viruses, ensure that all external devices either belong to you or come from a reliable source.

    Protect your personal information online

    Your privacy on the internet depends on your ability to control both the amount of personal information that you provide and who has access to that information. Find out how to protect your privacy on the internet.

    Protect yourself from scams

    When you read email, use social media, or browse the web, you should be wary of scams that try to steal your personal information (also known as identity theft), your money, or both. Many of these scams are known as "phishing scams" because they "fish" for your information. Find out how to protect yourself from phishing scams and avoid tech support scams.

    Prevent and remove malware

    One important step toward greater workplace security is to protect your computer against malware.

    Windows Security

    Windows Security (or Windows Defender Security Center in Windows 8 or early versions of Windows 10) is built in to Windows and provides real-time malware detection, prevention, and removal with cloud-delivered protection. It is intended for home, small business, and enterprise customers. For more info, see Help protect my computer with Windows Security.

    Other ways to remove malware

    To assist all Windows customers, including those who are not running Windows Security, Microsoft provides Microsoft Defender Offline.

    Microsoft Defender Offline

    Microsoft Defender Offline runs outside of Windows to remove rootkits and other threats that hide from the Windows operating system. This tool uses a small, separate operating environment, where evasive threats are unable to hide from antimalware scanners.

    With Windows 10 and 11, Microsoft Defender Offline is built in to the operating system and can run from Windows Security. It is provided as a separate download for previous versions of Windows.

    Learn more about Microsoft Defender Offline

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    स्रोत : support.microsoft.com

    18 Ways to Secure Your SMB's Devices and Network

    These tips can help you secure your devices and prevent hackers from breaching your network.

    18 Ways to Secure Your Devices From Hackers

    Max Freedman

    Business News Daily Contributing Writer

    Updated Jun 29, 2022

    Cybersecurity is critical for businesses of all sizes. These 18 tips can help you secure your computers and mobile devices from malicious actors.

    Hackers are criminals who gain unauthorized access to a network and devices, usually with the intent to steal sensitive data, such as financial information or company secrets.

    You can protect your computers by using firewalls and antivirus software and by following best practices for computer use.

    You can protect your mobile devices by turning off Bluetooth when it’s not in use, being mindful of the Wi-Fi networks you connect to and using security applications to improve monitoring and protection.

    The growth of the World Wide Web in the 1990s introduced new possibilities and spawned new industries, but it also brought about new downsides of connectivity. Tons of spam started to infiltrate email accounts, and computer viruses wreaked havoc on business networks. A new threat known as computer hacking extended the definition of thievery to include infiltrating your computer, stealing personal information, tricking you into revealing private data, and using that data to steal and extort personal information, such as business secrets, bank account credentials and even people’s identities.

    What are computer hackers?

    Computer hackers are people who break into internet-connected devices such as computers, tablets and smartphones, usually with the intent to steal, change or delete information.

    Just as other thieves have malicious intent, hackers usually find their way into devices for negative purposes. (However, one exception is so-called white hat hackers, whom companies hire to break into their devices to find security flaws that need to be fixed.) Hackers may want to steal, alter or delete information in your devices, and they often do so by installing malware (software used for malicious purposes) you might not even know is there. These thieves might get access to your most precious data before you’re aware of a break-in.

    Hackers are interested in gaining unauthorized access to your devices to steal sensitive data.

    Types of hacking

    Here are some of the reasons computer hackers break into devices:

    Financial crimes. We’ve all heard the classic story of somebody checking their credit card statement, only to find transactions they didn’t make. These false transactions are often the result of computer hackers stealing your credit card numbers, checking account info or gaining access to other financial data.Vandalism. Hacking has its own subculture, so some hackers may want to vandalize certain websites just to show off to other hackers. Does it sound ridiculous? Don’t make the mistake of not taking this motivation seriously; it’s fairly common, according to Malwarebytes.Hacktivism. This portmanteau describes a form of hacking somewhat like vandalism. Some hackers may want to alter or destroy certain websites for politically motivated reasons.Corporate espionage. Spying existed long before the internet era, and hacking has only made espionage more accessible to the everyday person. With much of the world constantly connected to the internet, one company can hack into other companies’ devices to steal their information and use it to build an unfair competitive advantage. Hackers have a variety of motivations, ranging from financial gain to political goals. Awareness of these intentions can help you anticipate attacks that could affect your small business.

    How to secure your computer from hackers

    Despite the prevalence of computer hackers, most businesses rely on the internet to track their financials, order and maintain inventory, conduct marketing and PR campaigns, connect with customers, engage in social media, and perform other critical operations. Yet we continue to hear about massive computer breaches, even at giant corporations with robust security measures in place.

    Small businesses are often targeted as well, especially because they may underestimate the risk of cybercrime and may not have the resources to employ expensive cybersecurity solutions. Follow these tips to protect your devices and safeguard your sensitive data:

    1. Use a firewall.

    Windows and macOS have built-in firewalls – software designed to create a barrier between your information and the outside world. Firewalls prevent unauthorized access to your business network and alert you to any intrusion attempts.

    Make sure the firewall is enabled before you go online. You can also purchase a hardware firewall from companies such as Cisco, Sophos or Fortinet, depending on your broadband router, which also has a built-in firewall that protects your network. If you have a larger business, you can purchase an additional business networking firewall.

    2. Install antivirus software.

    Computer viruses and malware are everywhere. Antivirus programs such as Bitdefender, Panda Free Antivirus, Malwarebytes and Avast protect your computer against unauthorized code or software that may threaten your operating system. Viruses may have easy-to-spot effects – for example, they might slow your computer or delete key files – or they may be less conspicuous.

    स्रोत : www.businessnewsdaily.com

    How to Protect Your Digital Privacy

    Follow these simple steps to lock down your devices and accounts and take back some control over who has access to your data.

    Continue reading the main story

    The Privacy Project LOG IN

    How to Protect Your Digital Privacy

    By Thorin Klosowski

    Illustrations by Jon Han

    By making a few simple changes to your devices and accounts, you can maintain security against outside parties’ unwanted attempts to access your data as well as protect your privacy from those you don’t consent to sharing your information with. Getting started is easy. Here’s a guide to the few simple changes you can make to protect yourself and your information online.

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    Continue reading the main story

    Use These Tools

    Make smart use of the tools available to keep your data safe.

    Secure your accounts

    Why: In the past decade, data breaches and password leaks have struck companies such as Equifax, Facebook, Home Depot, Marriott, Target, Yahoo, and countless others. If you have online accounts, hackers have likely leaked data from at least one of them. Want to know which of your accounts have been compromised? Search for your email address on Have I Been Pwned? to cross-reference your email address with hundreds of data breaches.How: Everyone should use a password manager to generate and remember different, complex passwords for every account — this is the most important thing people can do to protect their privacy and security today. Wirecutter’s favorite password managers are LastPass and 1Password. Both can generate passwords, monitor accounts for security breaches, suggest changing weak passwords, and sync your passwords between your computer and phone. Password managers seem intimidating to set up, but once you’ve installed one you just need to browse the Internet as usual. As you log in to accounts, the password manager saves your passwords and suggests changing weak or duplicate passwords. Over the course of a couple of weeks, you end up with new passwords for most of your accounts. Take this time to also change the default passwords for any devices in your house — if your home router, smart light bulbs, or security cameras are still using “password” or “1234” as the password, change them.

    Everyone should also use two-step authentication whenever possible for their online accounts. Most banks and major social networks provide this option. As the name suggests, two-step authentication requires two steps: entering your password and entering a number only you can access. For example, step one is logging in to Facebook with your username and password. In step two, Facebook sends a temporary code to you in a text message or, even better, through an app like Google Authenticator, and you enter that code to log in.

    Protect your Web browsing

    Why: Companies and websites track everything you do online. Every ad, social network button, and website collects information about your location, browsing habits, and more. The data collected reveals more about you than you might expect. You might think yourself clever for never tweeting your medical problems or sharing all your religious beliefs on Facebook, for instance, but chances are good that the websites you visit regularly provide all the data advertisers need to pinpoint the type of person you are. This is part of how targeted ads remain one of the Internet’s most unsettling innovations.How: A browser extension like uBlock Origin blocks ads and the data they collect. The uBlock Origin extension also prevents malware from running in your browser and gives you an easy way to turn the ad blocking off when you want to support sites you know are secure. Combine uBlock with Privacy Badger, which blocks trackers, and ads won’t follow you around as much. To slow down stalker ads even more, disable interest-based ads from Apple, Facebook, Google, and Twitter. A lot of websites offer means to opt out of data collection, but you need to do so manually. Simple Opt Out has direct links to opt-out instructions for major sites like Netflix, Reddit, and more. Doing this won’t eliminate the problem completely, but it will significantly cut down the amount of data collected.

    You should also install the HTTPS Everywhere extension. HTTPS Everywhere automatically directs you to the secure version of a site when the site supports that, making it difficult for an attacker — especially if you’re on public Wi-Fi at a coffee shop, airport, or hotel — to digitally eavesdrop on what you’re doing.

    Some people may want to use a virtual private network (VPN), but it’s not necessary for everyone. If you frequently connect to public Wi-Fi, a VPN is useful because it adds a layer of security to your browsing when HTTPS isn’t available. It can also provide some privacy from your Internet service provider and help minimize tracking based on your IP address. But all your Internet activity still flows through the VPN provider’s servers, so in using a VPN you’re choosing to trust that company over your ISP not to store or sell your data. Make sure you understand the pros and cons first, but if you want a VPN, Wirecutter recommends IVPN.

    Use antivirus software on your computer

    स्रोत : www.nytimes.com

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