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    Penalty kick (association football)

    Penalty kick (association football)

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    For the method of resolving a tied match, see Penalty shoot-out (association football). For other uses, see Penalty shot.

    Josef Martínez of Atlanta United taking a penalty kick versus the New England Revolution

    A penalty kick (commonly known as a penalty or a spot kick) is a method of restarting play in association football, in which a player is allowed to take a single shot at the goal while it is defended only by the opposing team's goalkeeper. It is awarded when an offence punishable by a direct free kick is committed by a player in their own penalty area. The shot is taken from the penalty mark, which is 11 m (12 yards) from the goal line and centred between the touch lines.

    Contents

    1 Procedure 2 Infringements 3 Tap penalty 4 Saving tactics

    4.1 "Reading" the kicker

    4.2 Use of knowledge of kicker's history

    4.3 Distraction

    5 Scoring statistics

    5.1 Saving statistics

    6 Offences for which the penalty kick is awarded

    7 History 7.1 Early proposals

    7.2 Introduction of the penalty-kick

    7.3 Subsequent developments

    7.4 Summary

    7.5 Offences for which a penalty kick was awarded

    8 See also 9 References 10 External links

    Procedure[edit]

    Diagram of the penalty area

    The ball is placed on the penalty mark, regardless of where in the penalty area the foul occurred. The player taking the kick must be identified to the referee. Only the kicker and the defending team's goalkeeper are allowed to be within the penalty area; all other players must be within the field of play, outside the penalty area, behind the penalty mark, and a minimum of 9.15m (10 yd) from the penalty mark (this distance is denoted by the penalty arc).[1] The goalkeeper is allowed to move before the ball is kicked, but must remain on the goal-line between the goal-posts, facing the kicker, without touching the goalposts, crossbar, or goal net. At the moment the kick is taken, the goalkeeper must have at least part of one foot touching, or in line with, the goal line. The assistant referee responsible for the goal line where the penalty kick is being taken is positioned at the intersection of the penalty area and goal line, and assists the referee in looking for infringements and/or whether a goal is scored.

    The referee blows the whistle to indicate that the penalty kick may be taken. The kicker may make feinting (deceptive or distracting) movements during the run-up to the ball, but may not do so once the run-up is completed. The kick and the last step the kicker takes must be in motion. The ball must be stationary before the kick, and it must be kicked forward. The ball is in play once it is kicked and moves, and at that time other players may enter the penalty area and penalty arc. The kicker may not touch the ball a second time until it has been touched by another player of either team or goes out of play (including into the goal).

    Infringements[edit]

    This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

    In case of an infringement of the laws of the game during a penalty kick, most commonly entering the penalty area illegally, the referee must consider both whether the ball entered the goal, and which team(s) committed the offence. If both teams commit an offence, a rekick is taken.

    A penalty kick being taken by Bonaventure Kalou

    Result of the kick No violation Violation by the attacking team only Violation by the defence only

    Enters the goal Goal Rekick Goal

    Goes directly out of bounds Goal kick Goal kick Rekick

    Rebounds into play from goal frame/goalkeeper Play continues Indirect free kick Rekick

    Saved & held by goalkeeper Play continues Play continues Rekick

    Deflected out of bounds by goalkeeper Corner kick Indirect free kick Rekick

    The following infringements committed by the kicking team result in an indirect free kick for the defending team, regardless of the outcome of the kick:

    a teammate of the identified kicker kicks the ball instead (the player who took the kick is cautioned)

    kicker feints kicking the ball at the end of the run-up (the kicker is cautioned)

    kick does not go forward

    kicker touches the ball a second time before it touches another player (includes rebounds off the goal posts or crossbar)

    In the case of a player repeatedly infringing the laws during the penalty kick, the referee may caution the player for persistent infringement. All offences that occur before kick may be dealt with in this manner, regardless of the location of the offence.

    स्रोत : en.wikipedia.org

    Law 12

    IFAB Laws of the Game 2022-23

    LAWS OF THE GAME & FA RULES

    LAWS OF THE GAME & FA RULES LAW 12: FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

    IFAB Laws of the Game 2022-23

    Shares

    Law 12 Fouls and Misconduct

    Direct and indirect free kicks and penalty kicks can only be awarded for offences committed when the ball is in play.

    1. Direct free kick

    A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences against an opponent in a manner considered by the referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:

    charges jumps at

    kicks or attempts to kick

    pushes

    strikes or attempts to strike (including head-butt)

    tackles or challenges

    trips or attempts to trip

    If an offence involves contact it is penalised by a direct free kick or penalty kick.

    Careless is when a player shows a lack of attention or consideration when making a challenge or acts without precaution. No disciplinary sanction is needed

    Reckless is when a player acts with disregard to the danger to, or consequences for, an opponent and must be cautioned

    Using excessive force is when a player exceeds the necessary use of force and endangers the safety of an opponent and must be sent off

    A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences:

    a handball offence (except for the goalkeeper within their penalty area)

    holds an opponent

    impedes an opponent with contact

    bites or spits at someone on the team lists or a match official

    throws an object at the ball, opponent or match official, or makes contact with the ball with a held object

    See also offences in Law 3

    HANDLING THE BALL

    For the purposes of determining handball offences, the upper boundary of the arm is in line with the bottom of the armpit. Not every touch of a player’s hand/arm with the ball is an offence.

    It is an offence if a player:

    deliberately touches the ball with their hand/arm, for example moving the hand/arm towards the ball

    touches the ball with their hand/arm when it has made their body unnaturally bigger. A player is considered to have made their body unnaturally bigger when the position of their hand/arm is not a consequence of, or justifiable by, the player’s body movement for that specific situation. By having their hand/arm in such a position, the player takes a risk of their hand/arm being hit by the ball and being penalised

    scores in the opponents' goal:

    directly from their hand/arm, even if accidental, including by the goalkeeper

    immediately after the ball has touched their hand/arm, even if accidental

    The goalkeeper has the same restrictions on handling the ball as any other player outside the penalty area. If the goalkeeper handles the ball inside their penalty area when not permitted to do so, an indirect free kick is awarded but there is no disciplinary sanction.  However, if the offence is playing the ball a second time (with or without the hand/arm) after a restart before it touches another player, the goalkeeper must be sanctioned if the offence stops a promising attack or denies an opponent or the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity.

    2. Indirect Free Kick

    An indirect free kick is awarded if a player:

    plays in a dangerous manner

    impedes the progress of an opponent without any contact being made

    is guilty of dissent, using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or action(s) or other verbal offences

    prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from the hands or kicks or attempts to kick the ball when the goalkeeper is in the process of releasing it

    initiates a deliberate trick for the ball to be passed (including from a free kick or goal kick) to the goalkeeper with the head, chest, knee etc. to circumvent the Law, whether or not the goalkeeper touches the ball with the hands; the goalkeeper is penalised if responsible for initiating the deliberate trick

    commits any other offence, not mentioned in the Laws, for which play is stopped to caution or send off a player

    An indirect free kick is awarded if a goalkeeper, inside their penalty area, commits any of the following offences:

    controls the ball with the hand/arm for more than six seconds before releasing it

    touches the ball with the hand/arm after releasing it and before it has touched another player

    touches the ball with the hand/arm, unless the goalkeeper has clearly kicked or attempted to kick the ball to release it into play, after:

    it has been deliberately kicked to the goalkeeper by a team-mate

    receiving it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate

    A goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball with the hand(s) when:

    the ball is between the hands or between the hand and any surface (e.g. ground, own body) or by touching it with any part of the hands or arms except if the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper or the goalkeeper has made a save

    holding the ball in the outstretched open hand

    bouncing it on the ground or throwing it in the air

    A goalkeeper cannot be challenged by an opponent when in control of the ball with the hand(s).

    स्रोत : www.thefa.com

    If a player commits a foul in the penalty area and the penalty kick is awarded, is the player who committed a foul sent off or cautioned with a yellow card?

    Answer: Referees distinguish between offenses against the Laws of the Game, and offenses against the game itself. Or, as the Laws of the Game put it, between fouls and misconduct. This is a perfect example. A foul committed in the penalty area by a defending player against an attacking player m...

    If a player commits a foul in the penalty area and the penalty kick is awarded, is the player who committed a foul sent off or cautioned with a yellow card?

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    Sort James Keenley

    Lifelong Football/Soccer Fan, Current RefereeAuthor has 13.9K answers and 35.2M answer views1y

    Referees distinguish between offenses against the Laws of the Game, and offenses against the game itself. Or, as the Laws of the Game put it, between fouls and misconduct.

    This is a perfect example.

    A foul committed in the penalty area by a defending player against an attacking player merits a penalty kick. It has nothing to do with the type of foul, or the seriousness, intention, or egregiousness of the foul. It’s a simple matter of real estate. The penalty kick is awarded because the foul was committed in the penalty area (and hence the name of that large rectangular area).

    In other words, the most violent foul imaginable committed just outside the penalty area will result in a simple free kick. A simple and completely unintentional foul committed inside the penalty area will result in a penalty kick.

    If the foul includes some type of misconduct — an offense against the game itself — then a yellow card or red card may be shown to the player.

    The Laws of the Game detail the Cautionable offenses (yellow card):

    And the Sending-off (red card) offenses:

    1.2K viewsView upvotes

    James Keenley

    Lifelong Football/Soccer Fan, Current RefereeAuthor has 13.9K answers and 35.2M answer views5y

    Related

    What results in a drop ball when both teams in soccer commit fouls simultaneously (free kick, penalty kick, double foul, or none of the above)?

    Michael Foster is essentially correct.

    According to the Laws of the Game, Law 8 (The Start and Restart of Play), a dropped ball occurs after the referee has stopped play for something other than a foul or other infraction of the Laws. The procedure is as follows:

    “The referee drops the ball at the position where it was when play was stopped, unless play was stopped inside the goal area in which case the ball is dropped on the goal area line which is parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the ball was when play was stopped.

    The ball is in play when it touches the ground.

    Any number

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    Related

    In soccer, why isn’t a penalty kick done by the player who actually was rewarded in the penalty box?

    I understand and agree with all of the answers above, but I do kind of wish that the penalty had to be taken by the player who was fouled. In hockey, the player that is victimized by a penalty on a breakaway is the one who takes the penalty shot.

    I like the idea that the person who had the chance, should get the chance on the penalty shot, and that it MUST be him that takes the shot. It seems like the most honest way to justify a penalty shot; you trip him, he gets a shot on your goalie from point blank range.

    Especially in soccer, with such high scoring rates on the penalty kick I think this sh

    Nickoy Mitchell

    Teacher of Science at Ministry of Education, Jamaica (2015–present)Author has 524 answers and 223K answer views3y

    Related

    How often do Manchester United players exercise penalty kick?

    To be honest, as a Manchester United supporter, I sadly say that I do not know. However, I do believe that they practice taking shots. But based on the recent two penalty misses that cost the team 2 points in the game against Wolves and the loss of three points against Crystal Palace today, August 24, 2019, I think they need to start practising to take penalty kicks more often.

    Andrew McKenzie

    just a fan with an unhealthy interest in the sport's pastAuthor has 2.5K answers and 7.1M answer views1y

    Related

    Where in the official laws of football does it address scoring on a rebound after a penalty kick?

    Law 14 specifies that once the ball is kicked toward the goal:

    The ball is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves.

    The kicker must not play the ball again until it has touched another player.

    Once the ball is in play, and someone else touches it, for instance the goalkeeper, then the shooter can do whatever they want because the ball is in play.

    Note that it has to touch another player first; the kick taker cannot score a rebound directly off the posts or crossbar.

    Law 14 - The Penalty Kick

    IFAB Laws of the Game

    https://www.thefa.com/football-rules-governance/lawsandrules/laws/football-11-11/law-14---the-penalty-kick

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