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    what word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a website?

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    KBC 14: What word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a....?

    KBC 14: What word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a website?

    quizdabbler Updated.2 hours ago

    KBC 14: What word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a....?

    (Photo Credit: Twitter/AmitabhBachchan)

    #KaunBanegaCrorepati#KBCPlayAlong#KBC2022

    KBC 14: What word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a website?

    KBC 14: What word can refer to the number of vehicles on the road, as well as the number of visitors to a website?

    Options: Signal Traffic Horn Driver Answer: Traffic

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    THE HIGHWAY CODE

    Read online New Official Highway Code UK valid for 2022. The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales and is essential reading for every road user. Applies to pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders as well as drivers

    Valid for the 2022. Updated 27/07/2022 >>

    Content

    Rules for pedestrians (1 to 35)

    Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and powered mobility scooters (36 to 46)

    Rules about animals (47 to 58)

    Rules for cyclists (59 to 82)

    Rules for motorcyclists (83 to 88)

    Rules for drivers and motorcyclists (89 to 102)

    General rules, techniques and advice for all drivers and riders (103 to 158)

    Using the road (159 to 203)

    Road users requiring extra care (204 to 225)

    Driving in adverse weather conditions (226 to 237)

    Waiting and parking (238 to 252)

    Motorways (253 to 273)

    Breakdowns and incidents (274 to 287)

    Road works, level crossings and tramways (288 to 307)

    Traffic Signs and Signals

    Direction signs on roads and motorways

    Information signs

    Light signals controlling traffic

    Road markings

    Road signs giving orders

    Road works signs

    Signals by authorised persons

    Signals to other road users

    Vehicle markings Warning signs

    Annexes

    You and your bicycle

    Motorcycle licence requirements

    Motor vehicle documentation and learner driver requirements

    The road user and the law

    Penalties

    Vehicle maintenance, safety and security

    First aid on the road

    Safety Code for new drivers

    Introduction

    Who The Highway Code is for, how it's worded, the consequences of not following the rules, self-driving vehicles, and the hierarchy of road users (Rules H1 to H3).

    This Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales. The Highway Code is essential reading for everyone.

    The aim of The Highway Code is to promote safety on the road, whilst also supporting a healthy, sustainable and efficient transport system.

    Wording of The Highway Code

    Knowing and applying the rules,Showthis sectionMany of the rules in The Highway Code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you are committing a criminal offence. You may be fined, given penalty points on your licence or be disqualified from driving. In the most serious cases you may be sent to prison. Such rules are identified by the use of the words ‘MUST/MUST NOT’. In addition, the rule includes an abbreviated reference to the legislation which creates the offence.

    Although failure to comply with the other rules of The Highway Code will not, in itself, cause a person to be prosecuted, The Highway Code may be used in evidence in any court proceedings under the Traffic Acts (see The road user and the law) to establish liability. This includes rules which use advisory wording such as ‘should/should not’ or ‘do/do not’.

    Knowing and applying the rules

    Knowing and applying the rules contained in The Highway Code could significantly reduce road casualties. Cutting the number of deaths and injuries that occur on our roads every day is a responsibility we all share. The Highway Code can help us discharge that responsibility. Further information on driving/riding techniques can be found in ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Driving – the essential skills’ and ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Riding – the essential skills’.

    gov.uk

    Self-driving vehicles

    By ‘self-driving vehicles’, we mean those listed as automated vehicles by the Secretary of State for Transport under the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018.

    To check if your vehicle is self-driving, visit Self-driving vehicles listed for use in Great Britain.

    These vehicles are capable of safely driving themselves when the self-driving function is correctly turned on and the driver follows the manufacturer’s instructions. While the vehicle is driving itself, you do not need to monitor it.

    Self-driving vehicles differ from vehicles that are fitted only with assisted driving features (like cruise control and lane-keeping assistance). Assisted driving features can do some of the driving, but the driver still needs to be responsible for driving at all times. If you are driving a vehicle using only its assisted driving features, Rule 150 applies.

    A self-driving vehicle’s ability to drive itself may be limited to certain situations or parts of a journey. Things like the type of road, time of day, weather, location and speed may affect this. You should follow the manufacturer’s instructions about when and how to use the self-driving function safely.

    While a self-driving vehicle is driving itself in a valid situation, you are not responsible for how it drives. You may turn your attention away from the road and you may also view content through the vehicle’s built-in infotainment apparatus, if available.

    But you MUST still follow all relevant laws

    You MUST be fit to drive (for example, you must be within the drink-drive legal limits and not be under the influence of drugs). See Rules 90 to 96.

    The vehicle MUST be road legal (for example, it must have an MOT certificate, if applicable, and it must be taxed and insured). The vehicle must be roadworthy (see Rules 89 and 97; and Annexes 3 and 6). You will also still be responsible for your passengers and anything else you are carrying (see Rules 98 to 102).

    You MUST NOT do anything illegal – like using a handheld mobile phone, or similar hand-held device. There are exceptions to this, which are set out in Rule 149.

    स्रोत : www.highwaycodeuk.co.uk

    traffic control

    traffic control, supervision of the movement of people, goods, or vehicles to ensure efficiency and safety. Traffic is the movement of people and goods from one location to another. The movement typically occurs along a specific facility or pathway that can be called a guideway. It may be a physical guideway, as in the case of a railroad, or it may be an agreed-upon or designated route, marked either electronically (as in aviation) or geographically (as in the maritime industry). Movement—excepting pedestrian movement, which only requires human power—involves a vehicle of some type that can serve for people, goods, or

    traffic control

    By F.D. Hobbs See All • Edit History

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    traffic control, supervision of the movement of people, goods, or vehicles to ensure efficiency and safety.

    Traffic is the movement of people and goods from one location to another. The movement typically occurs along a specific facility or pathway that can be called a guideway. It may be a physical guideway, as in the case of a railroad, or it may be an agreed-upon or designated route, marked either electronically (as in aviation) or geographically (as in the maritime industry). Movement—excepting pedestrian movement, which only requires human power—involves a vehicle of some type that can serve for people, goods, or both. Vehicle types, often referred to as modes of transportation, can be broadly characterized as road, rail, air, and maritime (i.e., water-based).

    Traffic evolves because of a need to move people and goods from one location to another. As such, the movement is initiated because of decisions made by people to transport themselves or others from one location to another to participate in activities at that second location or to move goods to a location where they have higher value. Traffic flows thus differ fundamentally from other areas of engineering and the physical sciences (such as the movement of electrons in a wire), because they are primarily governed and determined by laws of human behaviour. While physical attributes are critical in the operation of all modes (e.g., to keep airplanes in the air), the demand or need to travel that gives rise to traffic is derived from the desire to change locations.

    One of the principal challenges in traffic control is to accommodate the traffic in a safe and efficient way. Efficiency can be thought of as a measure of movement levels relative to the objectives for a particular transportation system and the finances required for its operation. For example, a railroad can be thought of as efficient if it can accommodate the travel requirements of its customers at the least cost. It will be thought of as inefficient if an alternative (e.g., a trucking service) can also meet customer needs but at a lower cost.

    Safety, the management of traffic to reduce or eliminate accidents, is the other critical reason for traffic control. An airline pilot needs to be warned of high winds at the destination airport just as an automobile driver needs to be warned of a dangerous curve or intersection ahead. Traffic control has as its principal objective to manage the movement of people and goods as efficiently and safely as possible. The dual objectives, however, frequently conflict or, at least, compete. For example, there are frequent cases in which commercial airlines are held on the ground at their originating airport until they receive a clearance to land at a destination. The clearance is given only when the destination airport determines that the number of airplanes expected to arrive at a particular time is small enough that local air traffic controllers can assist the plane in landing without overtaxing their human limitations and compromising safety.

    In road traffic, intersections with traffic lights (i.e., green, amber, and red indications) will often add a separate lane with a lighted green arrow to allow left turns with no opposing traffic. This frequently results in longer nongreen periods at the intersection, causing an increased delay and a reduction in efficiency and mobility. Traffic control will always be burdened with seeking to satisfy the frequently conflicting goals of safety and mobility.

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    Safety is not the exclusive concern of the traffic control community. Nearly every transportation mode has organizations that regulate operators through a series of licensing procedures, sanctions for inappropriate operating practices, and requirements for continuing training to retain certification to operate. Examples include federal aviation authorities that oversee pilot training (e.g., the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration); road agencies that administer driver’s licenses may exist at the provincial level (as in Canada) or at the national level (as is more common in Europe). Transportation safety management is thus accomplished through a complex set of interactions between different agencies at different levels (e.g., national, regional or state, and local) using both formal legal requirements and administrative actions. The following discussion will necessarily focus on safety concerns that evolve from and are a component of the traffic control function.

    Overview

    Traffic control is a critical element in the safe and efficient operation of any transportation system. Elaborate operational procedures, rules and laws, and physical devices (e.g., signs, markings, and lights) are but a few of the components of any traffic control system. At the centre of any system is the operator: a driver or pedestrian in a roadway system, a pilot in aviation or maritime systems, and a locomotive engineer in railway systems. While traffic control can be considered initially as a need to control or influence large numbers of vehicles, it is important to realize that traffic is made up of a large number of individual operators who collectively must make consistent decisions in order for the systems to work safely and efficiently.

    स्रोत : www.britannica.com

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