if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    what would you use if you have multiple vpcs in aws and need to communicate between them?

    Mohammed

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get what would you use if you have multiple vpcs in aws and need to communicate between them? from screen.

    VPC to VPC connectivity

    Customers can use two different VPC flow patterns to set up multi-VPC environments: many-to-many, or hub-and-spoke.

    VPC to VPC connectivity

    PDF RSS

    Customers can use two different VPC flow patterns to set up multi-VPC environments: many-to-many, or hub-and-spoke. In the many-to-many approach, the traffic between each VPC is managed individually between each VPC. In the hub-and-spoke model, all inter-VPC traffic flows through a central resource, which routes traffic based on established rules.

    VPC peering

    The simplest way to connect two VPCs is to use VPC Peering. In this setup, a connection enables full bidirectional connectivity between the VPCs. This peering connection is used to route traffic between the VPCs. VPCs across accounts and AWS Regions can also be peered together. VPC peering incurs costs only for traffic traveling over the connection (there is no hourly infrastructure fee).

    VPC peering is point-to-point connectivity, and it does not support transitive routing. For example, if you have a VPC peering connection between VPC A and VPC B and between VPC A and VPC C, an instance in VPC B cannot transit through VPC A to reach VPC C. To route packets between VPC B and VPC C, you are required to create a direct VPC peering connection.

    At scale, when you have tens to hundreds of VPCs, interconnecting them with peering results in a mesh of hundreds to thousands of peering connections, which are difficult to manage and scale. For example, if you have 100 VPCs and you want to setup a full mesh peering between them, it will take 4,950 peering connections [n(n-1)/2] where n=total number of VPCs. There is a maximum limit of up to 125 active peering connections per VPC.

    Network setup using VPC peering

    If you are using VPC peering, on-premises connectivity (VPN and/or Direct Connect) must be made to each VPC. Resources in a VPC cannot reach on-premises using the hybrid connectivity of a peered VPC, as shown in the preceding figure.

    VPC peering is best used when resources in one VPC must communicate with resources in another VPC, the environment of both VPCs is controlled and secured, and the number of VPCs to be connected is less than 10 (to allow for the individual management of each connection). VPC peering offers the lowest overall cost when compared to other options for inter-VPC connectivity.

    स्रोत : docs.aws.amazon.com

    3 options for cross

    Using separate AWS accounts provides strong separation of resources, which is great until the point you need cross-account access from a VPC in one account to another. In this article you'll learn 3 ways to setup a secure connection across accounts, with full working examples you can try out yourself. Why do we need cross-account VPC access? A Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) is a private network which you create in the AWS cloud. You can deploy whatever resources you want into it, such as EC2 instances or ECS containers. By default, resources you create within the same VPC can communicate

    3 options for cross-account VPC access in AWS

    By Tom GregoryPosted on February 15, 2021

    Last Updated on November 7, 2022

    Using separate AWS accounts provides strong separation of resources, which is great until the point you need cross-account access from a VPC in one account to another. In this article you’ll learn 3 ways to setup a secure connection across accounts, with full working examples you can try out yourself.

    Contents

    Why do we need cross-account VPC access?

    An example cross-account requirement

    Option 1: VPC peering connection cross-account access

    Option 2: VPC endpoint service (PrivateLink) cross-account access

    Option 3: Transit gateway cross-account access

    Side-by-side comparison

    Why do we need cross-account VPC access?

    A Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) is a private network which you create in the AWS cloud. You can deploy whatever resources you want into it, such as EC2 instances or ECS containers.

    By default, resources you create within the same VPC can communicate with each other, assuming that security groups and access control lists are correctly setup. Conversely, resources deployed into separate VPCs cannot communicate with each other since there’s no route for the traffic to flow.

    VPCs work like this by design, as they’re a separate isolated private network. You can of course open them up to access other AWS services and the internet, but that’s something you have to explicitly do.

    Another isolation mechanism is the AWS account. By default, an AWS account cannot access resources from a different account.

    Some reasons organisations create separate accounts include:

    to isolate production and non-production resources

    to isolate resources for separate business units

    to simplify billing for separate business units

    Large organisations may have hundreds of AWS accounts. At some point it’s likely that access will be required between accounts. In this article we’re going to concentrate explicitly on accessing VPCs between accounts, or more explicitly resources deployed into those VPCs, such as EC2 instances.

    So why might a company want to do that? Here are some potential reasons.

    services deployed by a business unit in one account need to access services deployed in another (e.g. microservice architecture)

    services in a testing account may need to access services in a production account

    a company needs to provide access to services to another company, without exposing the service on the public internet

    An example cross-account requirement

    In the rest of this article we’ll explore 3 approaches for allowing access from an EC2 instance in one account to another EC2 instance in another account.

    The setup assumes:

    we’ve got 2 accounts Account A (the provider account) and Account B (the consumer account)

    the 2 accounts have VPCs with different CIDR blocks

    account A VPC CIDR = 10.0.0.0/16

    account B VPC CIDR = 172.31.0.0/16

    account A is running an EC2 instance called Instance A, which exposes some data over HTTP port 80

    account B is running an EC2 instance called Instance B, which needs to access the data from instance A in account A

    the data must remain with the AWS network and not go onto the public internet

    The following 3 options all assume this simple basic setup.

    Option 1: VPC peering connection cross-account access

    If two VPCs are peered, it means they have a network connection between them. With a VPC peering connection setup, instances in the VPC can talk to instances in the other, as if they were on the same network.

    The peering connection works both ways between the VPCs and you can peer VPCs in the same AWS account or separate accounts.

    Follow these steps to setup a peering connection between VPCs in different accounts.

    Step 1: create the VPC peering connection

    In the VPC dashboard of account A select Peering Connections then Create Peering Connection.

    for VPC (Requester) select the VPC you want to connect

    under Select another VPC to peer with we’re going to provide the details of the VPC in the other AWS account. Select Another account and enter the account B account id.

    if your other account is in a different region, under Region select Another Region and choose the region

    for VPC ID (Accepter) enter the VPC id of the VPC in account B

    click Create Peering Connection.

    VPC CIDR for VPC peering connections

    The VPC CIDR is the range of private IP address which can be allocated within the VPC. In order to create a peering connection between two VPCs, the CIDR block of the 2 accounts cannot overlap. For example:

    स्रोत : tomgregory.com

    AWS VPC to VPC Connection Options

    AWS Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) is one of the most popular features of AWS. It provides a logically isolated network layer for compute instances.

    AWS VPC to VPC Connection Options

    Richard Lenan Zhao

    Richard Lenan Zhao

    Cloud Architecture, Strategy and Operation

    Published Jan 7, 2022

    + Follow

    AWS Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) is one of the most popular features of AWS. It provides a logically isolated network layer for compute instances. Users can easily and effectively create VPCs in their AWS account(s). And when users have multiple VPCs, the next question is how to connect them together, so that the compute instances from different VPCs can communicate with each other. We'll go through the VPC connection options in this article.

    VPC Peering

    When we connect two VPCs together, the first option come to mind is probably VPC peering. VPC peering establishes a networking connection between two VPCs. Compute instances within either VPC can communicate with each other through this connection. And VPC peering supports connections between VPCs in either same account or different accounts, within the same region or across regions.

    Throughout this peering connection, there is no involvement of gateways or network appliances. AWS leverages their existing VPC infrastructure to create this peering connection, meaning there is no additional hops between VPCs. So it effectively removes the bandwidth bottleneck and reduces the latency. The network traffic also stays within AWS backbone networking without going out to the public internet, which reduces the security risks.

    However, this direct peering connection doesn't support transitive peering relationships. As shown in the diagram below, without direct peering connection, instances in VPC A can't communicate with the ones in VPC C, even both A and C are connected with VPC B.

    So the problem comes to multi-vpc and multi-account environments. For all VPCs to communicate with each other, we need to build a mesh topology network structure. We can use the formula Number of Connections = [(V-1)*V]/2 to calculate how many peering connections are required based on the quantity of VPCs, e.g. 6 VPCs will require [(6-1)*6]/2 = 15 peering connections, as shown below:

    Setting up and manage all these connections is no doubt a huge overhead. So AWS provides another option, the Transit Gateway.

    Transit Gateway

    Comparing with VPC peering's mesh structure, Transit Gateway connects VPCs together via the hub-and-spoke structure, as shown below:

    This hub-and-spoke structure significantly reduced the network complexity and number of connections. Using the earlier example, we can reduce the number of connections from 15 to 6. And the higher number of VPCs, the more connection reduction it produces. So we can see that this service is definitely welcomed by companies that manage a large number of VPCs.

    And as it's named, Transit Gateway is a gateway services. It's a network transit hub as a service that provides high availabilities and scalabilities. This means you can attach as many VPCs as you can without worrying about the availabilities and performance issues. Having said that, there are certain limits set by AWS, i.e. it supports up to 5000 connections and 50 Gbps bandwidth. But these numbers to most companies are enough. For more quota information, see Quotas for Transit Gateway.

    Transit Gateway was introduced back in 2018. Have we seen it fully replaced the VPC peering? No, and it won't be. Instead, many companies have chosen to mix these two connection methods in their network architectural design and implementation. The reason being is that there are a few "short slabs" of this Transit Gateway "barrel". The cost is one of them.

    Using our earlier example again, to connect 6 VPCs together via a Transit Gateway, there is a baseline cost as $0.07 USD/hour cost (based on the Sydney region rate) for each attachment. We'll be looking at 730 hours in a month x 0.07 USD x 6 attachments = 306.60 USD. This is in addition to the traffic cost. Whereas for VPC peering, AWS only charges for the traffic cost, no baseline cost. Yes, even if you create a fully connected mesh with 15 peering connections in this example case, there is no baseline cost from the VPC peering.

    In addition, there is a limit of 50 Gbps for Transit Gateway, whereas VPC peering has no bandwidth limits. So based on the pros and cons of both connection options, people choose to use one or another, or a combo of them.

    PrivateLink

    Another option for establishing connections between VPCs is the PrivateLink. To understand this service and compare it with the other ones we mentioned earlier, let's take a step back first. Let's think why we need to establish connections between VPCs.

    There are many traffic types that can happen through the connections between VPCs. One common pattern is that one VPC hosts the service provider (e.g. an API service provisioned via a cluster of EC2 instances) and the other VPC hosts the service consumer (e.g. an EC2 instance). The consumer needs to connect to the provider to consume the service. And to make the use case more specific, the traffic shouldn't go through the public Internet for security reason.

    We can achieve this access requirement via VPC peering but requires many configurations across CIDR, route tables and security groups. With the PrivateLink the configuration is simplified. We just need to create a VPC Endpoint and Endpoint Service at the consumer's VPC and provider's VPC respectively. That's it (as shown below). There is no need to worry about path definitions or route tables. We can even establish connection between VPCs that have CIDR overlaps, which is not possible for VPC peering.

    स्रोत : www.linkedin.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    Mohammed 15 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer