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    which novel is based on the famous partnership between the indian mathematician, shrinivasa ramanujan and his british mentor, the mathematician g. h. hardi?

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    The Indian Clerk

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    Author David Leavitt

    Country United States

    Genre Fictive biography,[1] Historical fiction

    Publisher Bloomsbury USA

    Publication date September 2008

    Pages 485 ISBN 1596910410

    is a biographical novel by David Leavitt, published in 2007. It is loosely based on the famous partnership between the Indian mathematician, Srinivasa Ramanujan, and his British mentor, the mathematician, G.H. Hardy. The novel was shortlisted for the 2009 International Dublin Literary Award.[2]

    Contents

    1 Summary 2 Setting 3 See also 4 References

    Summary[edit]

    The novel is inspired by the career of the self-taught mathematical genius Srinivasa Ramanujan, as seen mainly through the eyes of his mentor and collaborator G.H. Hardy, a British mathematics professor at Cambridge University.[3][4] The novel is framed through a series of here largely fictionalized lectures that Hardy gave on the subject of Ramanujan's life and mathematics at New Lecture School at Harvard in the summer of 1936 and the narrative switches between Hardy's recollections and the events of the 1910s when Ramanujan was in England. The framed narrative begins in January 1913, in Cambridge, England, where Hardy receives a letter filled with unorthodox but imaginative mathematics and asking for support and guidance.

    Setting[edit]

    The novel is set against the backdrop of the First World War and colonial India. It features such prominent writers and public figures as D. H. Lawrence, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell.

    See also[edit]

    Novels portal

    (2007) by Complicite, directed by Simon McBurney.

    (1991) by Robert Kanigel

    References[edit]

    ^ Taylor, D.J. (2008-01-26). "Adding up to a life". Book Review. . London, UK.^ "2009 Shortlist". International DUBLIN Literary Award. Retrieved 26 November 2014.^ Nell Freudenberger (September 16, 2007). "Lust for Numbers". .^ DJ Taylor (26 January 2008). "Adding up to a life". .

    This article about a historical novel of the 2000s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

    See guidelines for writing about novels. Further suggestions might be found on the article's talk page.

    vte

    Categories: 2007 American novelsSrinivasa RamanujanNovels set in University of CambridgeNovels by David LeavittFiction set in 1913Novels set in the 1910s2000s historical novel stubs

    स्रोत : en.wikipedia.org

    The Indian Clerk

    The Indian Clerk

    The Indian Clerk

    The Indian Clerk

    Author David Leavitt

    Country United States

    Genre Fictive biography,[1] Historical fiction

    Publisher Bloomsbury USA

    Publication date September 2008

    Pages 485 ISBN 1596910410

    is a biographical novel by David Leavitt, published in 2007. It is loosely based on the famous partnership between the Indian mathematician, Srinivasa Ramanujan, and his British mentor, the mathematician, G.H. Hardy. The novel was shortlisted for the 2009 International Dublin Literary Award.[2]

    Contents

    1 Summary 2 Setting 3 See also 4 References

    Summary

    The novel is inspired by the career of the self-taught mathematical genius Srinivasa Ramanujan, as seen mainly through the eyes of his mentor and collaborator G.H. Hardy, a British mathematics professor at Cambridge University.[3][4] The novel is framed through a series of here largely fictionalized lectures that Hardy gave on the subject of Ramanujan's life and mathematics at New Lecture School at Harvard in the summer of 1936 and the narrative switches between Hardy's recollections and the events of the 1910s when Ramanujan was in England. The framed narrative begins in January 1913, in Cambridge, England, where Hardy receives a letter filled with unorthodox but imaginative mathematics and asking for support and guidance.

    Setting

    The novel is set against the backdrop of the First World War and colonial India. It features such prominent writers and public figures as D. H. Lawrence, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell.

    See also

    Novels portal

    (2007) by Complicite, directed by Simon McBurney.

    (1991) by Robert Kanigel

    References

    ^ Taylor, D.J. (2008-01-26). "Adding up to a life". Book Review. . London, UK.^ "2009 Shortlist". International DUBLIN Literary Award. Retrieved 26 November 2014.^ Nell Freudenberger (September 16, 2007). "Lust for Numbers". .^ DJ Taylor (26 January 2008). "Adding up to a life". .

    This article about a historical novel of the 2000s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

    See guidelines for writing about novels. Further suggestions might be found on the article's talk page.

    v t e

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    स्रोत : profilpelajar.com

    The Indian Clerk

    The first issue a historical fiction writer needs to solve is how much research to include. Too little and the work lacks foundation; too much and it sinks under its weight. It is a difficult balance, a balance David Leavitt does not achieve in his 12th novel, The Indian Clerk. Past legal troubles with an […]

    The Indian Clerk

    WRITTEN BY DAVID LEAVITT

    REVIEW BY ADELAIDA LOWER

    The first issue a historical fiction writer needs to solve is how much research to include. Too little and the work lacks foundation; too much and it sinks under its weight. It is a difficult balance, a balance David Leavitt does not achieve in his 12th novel, The Indian Clerk. Past legal troubles with an earlier work (While England Sleeps) may have contributed to the dilemma. To be sued, lose in court, and have to edit an already published novel must be hard to forget. Regrettably, this novel shows it.

    In the winter of 1915, Cambridge University mathematician G.H. Hardy receives an extraordinary letter from Srinivasa Ramanujan, a clerk in India. In spite of Ramanujan’s lack of formal education, the tidbits of the work he sends make Hardy believe the Indian is a genius. Intrigued, Hardy decides to bring him to England. But when Ramanujan is finally convinced to make the journey, their only connection is mathematics. Hardy is “a man of habit,” a self-regarding atheist, and a repressed homosexual. The handsome Ramanujan is an orthodox high-caste Hindu, a married man, and a devotee of the goddess Namagiri.

    Leavitt sets this historical collaboration against a background of colonialism, prejudices, and sexual identity. He works with fascinating material. The Cambridge Apostles, the secret intellectual society to which Hardy belongs, has members such as John Maynard Keynes, Bertrand Russell, and Rupert Brooke. World War I brings strains, challenges, and disruption. There are appearances by D. H. Lawrence and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Throughout, Leavitt stays very close to his sources. He allows himself few flights of fancy and very little literary license. The result is a scholarly novel with little color and a sluggish pace.

    स्रोत : historicalnovelsociety.org

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