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    P N Bose: The man who laid the foundation for India’s Atmanirbhar steel industry

    P N Bose: The man who laid the foundation for India’s Atmanirbhar steel industry | Corporate News | The Avenue Mail

    BusinessCorporateJamshedpur

    P N Bose: The man who laid the foundation for India’s Atmanirbhar steel industry

    By News Desk

    Wednesday, 12 May 2021, 13:02:38 IST

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    Bose brought home a unique blend of patriotism, science, and pursuit of material wealth that had sought to create a strong and Independent India.

    Jamshedpur, May 12: History never forgets cathedral builders but rarely remembers the stone makers and foundation layers whose contributions are more often than not quietened by the dinning march of time. Pramatha Nath Bose is one such name that we cannot afford to forget particularly when India is ready to redefine her destiny under the proud banner of Atmanirbhar Bharat.

    Bose was a pioneer in the true sense of the word. At the turn of the 20th century when the nation was gripped in its long and hard struggle towards independence, it was Bose who wrote to Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata, the visionary founder of Tata Group, about the treasure trove of iron ore in Mayurbhanj in Odisha that became the foundation for the country’s modern steel sector.

    A geologist by training, Bose was born on May 12, 1855 in Gaipur, a small village located some 60 kms north east of Kolkata. After his early education in Krishnagar College and later at St. Xavier’s College, Bose went on to secure a graduation in science from London University before returning to India in 1880 to become the first Indian graded officer to join the Geological Survey of India (GSI).  While his initial work focussed on the Siwalik fossils (now housed in the British Museum) what he did in GSI over the next two decades includes several pioneering efforts including the discovery of petroleum in Assam, and several mineral and coal deposits across India and Myanmar. He even helped in setting up the first soap factory in India!

    His vision for the future of his country came wrapped in a unique scientific temperament that was clearly ahead of its time. In his single-minded pursuit of India’s independence, Bose believed that the future of the country’s industrialisation had to be built on a strong foundation of science. His vision was also a unique blend of then prevailing strong swadeshi spirit that saw the pursuit of material wealth for the collective good of the country as something to be proud of. India’s first President Dr Rajendra Prasad would later recall Bose’s contribution thus: “He could even at that age foresee great potentialities for industrial expansion by the development of geological resources, particularly of coal, iron and steel.”

    Jamsetji Tata invested his capital and entrepreneurial ability, to give Bose the resources to help set up India’s first iron and steel industry where he invested his knowledge of science and geology. He was aware of the fact that all his previous geological discoveries were used by the British Raj and thus, when he discovered rich iron ore reserves in Mayurbhanj, he brought it to the notice of Swadeshi industrialist, J N Tata, through his now famous letter of February 24, 1904, that led to the establishment of TISCO (now Tata Steel) at Sakchi in today’s Jamshedpur in Jharkhand state. Just a year before that, he had quit GSI, citing its discriminatory policies against his fellow countrymen.

    The deep sense of patriotism felt by Bose towards his country had made him reflect on the cause of poverty in India and search for possible solutions. He later wrote: “There is scarcely a section of our population that may be said to be prosperous. Our artisans, our peasants, our labourers, our educated classes, all are sunk in poverty. The outlook for them is equally gloomy. The Government services can offer only a few drops of water among thirsty millions. The only remedy that is likely to be of very wide application and is likely to afford substantial relief to all classes of our people is the development of our industries. It is industries alone which can relieve the distress of the mass of the people by lightening the pressure upon land; it is industries alone that can relieve the distress of our middle classes by affording them openings other than clerkships.”

    Today as the second largest steel producer in the world, when India stands head and shoulder above the rest, we owe a great debt of gratitude to P N Bose who legacy can be found in every ounce of steel that says ‘Made in India.’

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    P.N. Bose was first Indian geologist who found India’s vast iron

    P.N. Bose was first Indian geologist who found India’s vast iron-ore deposits

    Home / Society / Science and Technology

    P.N. Bose was first Indian geologist who found India’s vast iron-ore deposits

    Information Desk

    6 August, 2020 21:15:11

    It is most unlikely that people are familiar about a place in Bengal called Gobordanga. It is also unlikely that anyone ever heard of P.N. Bose, the man who pioneered India’s mineral excavations and helped the TATA group to set up their Jamshedpur township. But in this small, non-descript village of 24 Parganas was born a pioneer geologist in the late 19th-century, whose colossal achievements helped in shaping the Indian economy of today.

    Pramatha Nath Bose aka P.N. Bose was born on May 12, 1855. Since childhood, Bose was an exceptionally bright student. In fact, when he was 15, he was overqualified to appear for the entrance examination. In his spare time, he wrote poems which were later published and highly commended. Bose joined Krishnagar College but got transferred to St Xavier’s College (University of Calcutta) in his third year.  In 1874, he graduated from St Xavier’s College. While in college, he came to know about the Gilchrist Scholarship that would enable him to study abroad. He took the test and came out with flying colours and travelled to England to earn an undergraduate degree in science. Bose was in fact, the first Indian to get a BSc degree from Cambridge University. The science curriculum included Chemistry, Biology, Geology, Physical Geography and Mental Philosophy. While in England, he met Rabindranath Tagore and the two became very good friends. In 1877, he went on to attend the Royal School of Mines in London from where he graduated with maximum marks in biology and palaeontology.

    After this, Bose could have stayed back in the UK and made a life for himself in England, but he was a nationalist to the core who was keen on working for the upliftment of his motherland. While in England, he realized that industrial regeneration was the only way that India could take to advance economically. So he decided to return to India.

    Bose applied for a government job under the Secretary of State, for both the Indian Education department and the Geographical Survey of India. However, his application was rejected on both counts, and he was forced to stay in England. While there, he started delivering lectures at various educational institutions to tide through the financial crunch. Bose was undeterred by  these impediments and chose to became the secretary of the England-based India Society, a socio-political body that was fighting for justice in India. Although the society was short-lived, eminent personalities like Dadabhai Naoroji and Ananda Mohan Bose, were its members.

    Also read : The first woman physicist to get a PhD from Calcutta University!

    Meanwhile, Bose participated in political meetings and often criticized the British. This enraged the higher officials in London who decided to get rid of him by giving him the job he had applied for. He was given a chance to work under the Secretary of State of Indian Education, but chose to work for Geographical Survey of India (GSI), as his instincts were better suited for that field. He returned to India in 1880 and joined the GSI as its Assistant Super. This was the beginning of a long and illustrious career for him.

    From 1880 to 1887, Bose spent six months on the field in Madhya Pradesh and would spend the next six months writing extensive reports about his findings, in his Calcutta office. In this span of time, he came across the regions of Dhuli and Rajhara in Madhya Pradesh which had an abundance of iron ore deposits and were completely untouched. In 1890, he was sanctioned by the Bengal government to explore the districts of Darjeeling, a region known for its impenetrability due to its hills and forests. However, Bose’s expedition was successful, and he found ravines of coal.

    Bose’s most promising discovery came when he retired from GSI in 1903 and was approached by Mohini Mohan Dhar, the Dewan of Mayurbhanj district in Odisha. The Dewan knew well of Bose’s capabilities and promised to fund his endeavour if he wanted to engage in the geographical survey of the state. Bose undertook the responsibility of surveying the state which had no previous survey records and set to work in the winter of 1903.

    Along the slopes of Gurumahisani hills, Bose found unusually rich iron-ore deposits. In fact, Bose noted this in his survey—

    “It is tough to make even an approximate estimate of the quantity of available iron ores. But it would probably be no exaggeration to say that a practically inexhaustible supply for several furnaces on a modern scale may be safely depended upon.”

    His discovery soon reached all the corners of the world, and newspapers like ‘The Statesman’ and ‘The Englishman’ reported his work, and The Mining Journal Of London even appraised his findings. Realizing that this was the industrialization break India needed, Bose was quick to act. He wrote a letter to Jamshedji Tata’s sons urging them to leave the deposits in Dhuli and Rajhara in Madhya Pradesh, as they were miniscule compared to the one in Odisha.

    Following this, the Tata group set out to establish his findings, and Bose’s prediction was right. Even today, Odisha is the largest producer of iron ore in the country

    स्रोत : www.getbengal.com

    India's Iron Man: The Unsung Pioneer Who Made JN Tata's Industrial Dream A Reality!

    Bose left for the University Of London in 1874, for an undergraduate degree in Science—the curriculum included chemistry, biology, geology, physical geography and mental philosophy. He graduated in 1877 and went on to attend the Royal School of Mines in London.

    India’s Iron Man: The Unsung Pioneer Who Made JN Tata’s Industrial Dream A Reality!

    Pramatha Nath Bose is an Indian geologist in the late 19th century, whose achievements have shaped the Indian economy of today.

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    Born on May 12, 1855, in the village of Gaipur in West Bengal, Pramatha Nath Bose or PN Bose is counted amongst India’s most eminent scientists, and his many achievements spearheaded the technological revolution in India.

    Bose was always a meritorious student. In fact, when he was 15, he was overqualified to appear for the entrance examination for the Krishnagar College. So in this spare time, he wrote poems which would later go on to be published and admired.

    Bose joined the Krishnagar College but transferred to St Xavier’s College (University of Calcutta) in his third year, and it is here that he came across the Gilchrist scholarship, which would give him the opportunity to study in London.

    He appeared for the examination and to no one’s surprise, stood first.

    Bidding goodbye to his friends and family, Bose left for the University Of London in 1874, for an undergraduate degree in Science—the curriculum included chemistry, biology, geology, physical geography and mental philosophy.

    University of London source: Wikicommons

    After excelling in the course, he graduated in 1877 and went on to attend the Royal School of Mines in London from where he graduated with maximum marks in biology and palaeontology.

    Now, the young man had two choices in front of him. He could carry on in England, where he had a brilliant career ahead of him, or employ his teachings for the betterment of India.

    Bose, did the latter. While in England, he learned that industrial regeneration was the only way that India could advance out of England’s clutches, and that was possible only through scientific methods.

    Bose applied for a government job under the Secretary of State, for both the Indian Education department and the Geographical Survey of India. However, he was not accepted into any position and was forced to stay in England. So, he started delivering lectures as a means of income.

    Source: Veethi

    Bose, however, was determined to fight for the cause of India and became the secretary of the England-based India Society, a socio-political body that was fighting for justice in India. Although the society was short-lived, eminent personalities like Dadabhai Naoroji and Ananda Mohan Bose, were its members.

    Bose would take part in political meetings and would strongly criticise the England government. This enraged the higher officials in London who decided to get rid of him by giving him the job he had applied for. He was given a chance to work under the Secretary of State of Indian Education, but chose to work for Geographical Survey of India (GSI), as his instincts were better suited for that field.

    Bose returned to India in 1880 and joined the GSI as its Assistant Superintendent. This was the beginning of a long and illustrious career for him.

    From 1880 to 1887, Bose spent six months on the field in Madhya Pradesh and would spend the next six months writing extensive reports about his findings, in his Calcutta office.

    In this span of time, he came across the regions of Dhuli and Rajhara in Madhya Pradesh which had an abundance of iron ore deposits and were completely untouched.

    You may also like: Ignored For the Nobel Prize, This Unsung Scientist Is The Father Of Fibre Optics!

    In 1890, he was sanctioned by the Bengal government to explore the districts of Darjeeling, a region known for its impenetrability due to its hills and forests. However, Bose’s expedition was successful, and he found ravines of coal.

    Bose’s most promising discovery came when he retired from GSI in 1903 and was approached by Mohini Mohan Dhar, the Dewan of Mayurbhanj district in Odisha ( formerly Orissa). The Dewan knew well of Bose’s capabilities and promised to fund his endeavour if he wanted to engage in the geographical survey of the state.

    Bose undertook the responsibility of surveying the state which had no previous survey records and set to work in the winter of 1903.

    Along the slopes of Gurumahisani hills, Bose found unusually rich iron-ore deposits. In fact, Bose noted this in his survey—

    “It is tough to make even an approximate estimate of the quantity of available iron ores. But it would probably be no exaggeration to say that a practically inexhaustible supply for several furnaces on a modern scale may be safely depended upon.”

    His discovery soon reached all the corners of the world, and newspapers like ‘The Statesman’ and ‘The Englishman’ reported his work, and The Mining Journal Of London even appraised his findings.

    Understanding that this was the industrialisation break India needed, Bose was quick to act. He wrote a letter to Jamshedji Tata’s sons urging them to leave the deposits in Dhuli and Rajhara in Madhya Pradesh, as they were miniscule compared to the one in Odisha.

    स्रोत : www.thebetterindia.com

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